Past Exhibition

IMPRESSIONS, MARKINGS AND MORE

Exhibition runs April 12th 2018 - April 28th 2018

FEATURING SPACE GALLERY ARTISTS

HAZE DIEDRICH

MIGUEL EDWARDS

JEAN-PIERRE MORIN

KAREN SCHARER

JEFF WENZEL

JOHN WOOD


    • When I am Old
    • Oil on Canvas
    • 54" x 54"
Press Release
  • Exhibition: IMPRESSIONS, MARKINGS AND MORE
  • Showing: April 12th 2018 - April 28th 2018
 To support artists and encourage everyone to become a collector, Windows to the Divine® hosts four types of art events: national art exhibitions, paint outs, collector salons and national collector symposiums. The primary emphasis of the salons and symposiums is public and collector education. At exhibitions and paint outs, in addition to educational opportunities, all collectors — from beginner to connoisseur — can acquire high-caliber original art works from renowned and emerging artists from Colorado and around the country. To ensure accessibility or all, we showcase works in a wide range of styles and prices.

FEATURING WORK BY:

Kathy Anderson, Carolyn Barlock, Daniel Bilmes, Stephanie Birdsall, Scott Burdick, Haze Diedrich

Marin Dobson, Miguel Edwards, Kelli Folsom, Michael Gadlin, Ann Gargotto, Ron Gerbrandt

Ulrich Gleiter, Albert Handell, Stephanie Hartshorn, Ron Hicks, Liu Huihan, Jane Hunt

Susie Hyer, Olga & Aleksey Ivanov, Carol Jenkins, Michael Klein, Calvin Liang

Terrie Lombardi, Karol Mack, David W Mayer, Dan McCaw, Danny McCaw

John McCaw, Jean-Pierre Morin, CW Mundy, Desmond O’Hagan, Vanessa Rothe

Don Sahli, Karen Scharer, Beth Sistrunk, Jill Soukup, Ardith Starostka

Adrienne Stein, Cheryl St. John, Nancy Switzer, Clive Tyler, Karen Vance, Jeff Wenzel

John Wood, Vincent Xeus, Ron Zito

 

Please visit the website for more information:

https://windowstothedivine.org/product-category/art-catalogue-2018/

Windows to the Divine® has been honored to exhibit the works of more than 225 artists with art sales of nearly $1 million.  Approximately 6,000 supporters have attended the Windows events.

Past Exhibition

INFORMED – Print as an Influence

Exhibition runs March 1st 2018 - April 7th 2018


OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY, MARCH 1ST 2018 | 5PM–8PM


FEATURING WORK BY:

SUE OEHME
PATRICIA AARON
TAIKO CHANDLER
CONNIE SADDLEMIRE
MONROE HODDER
DIANE CIONNI
WENDY KOWYNIA
PATTY LEE BECKER

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

  • Taiko Chandler, Downstream #1, Monotype, 18" x 26"
  • Diane Cionni, Spooky Action, Embellished Monoprint, 27" x 41.5"
Press Release
  • Exhibition: INFORMED – Print as an Influence
  • Showing: March 1st 2018 - April 7th 2018
In this exhibit we look at eight artists who use printmaking as a conduit to their work in other mediums: painting, sculpture and installation. Is printmaking the informer in this process of transitioning between two mediums or is it being informed by the other disciplines that these artists use in their work? Each artist will present their print work along side work they do in other mediums so you can decide.

Past Exhibition

RECONFIGURED II

Exhibition runs January 18th 2018 - February 24th 2018


OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY, JANUARY 18TH 2018 | 5PM–8PM


FEATURING WORK BY:

WILLIAM STOEHR
JASON LEE GIMBEL
MICHAEL GADLIN

 

Press Release
  • Exhibition: RECONFIGURED II
  • Showing: January 18th 2018 - February 24th 2018

WILLIAM STOEHR
For me the essence of art is the exploration of fundamental issues of our time. The meaning of life and the human condition are themes of interest. This is the larger conversation; the wider dialog that I want to be part of and so I explore intolerance, discrimination, addiction and violence with its victims, witnesses and survivors.

My large portraits start with an ambiguous expression, shared gaze and uncertain context calculated to provoke you into creating the narrative. I use a limited pallet of acrylic paint along with metallic and iridescent colors that produce changing patterns with changes in lighting and view angle.

Working freely, I drip, brush, pour, scrub and scape paint while applying a variety of lines, dots and other adjustments. I often paint multi-views or facial features slightly out of alignment. I frequently paint vaguely different expressions for each side of the face. These variations might make my images appear more real as time, half remembered memories, and prior experiences affect your perception.

 

MICHAEL GADLIN
I am dedicated to exploring visual elements that challenge traditions in painting. In my work, I focus on the process and interaction of layers that become meaningful and rich upon further examination. My philosophy is to be sentient through my raw figurative interpretations that make for a visual confrontation. I find tension to be the most meaningful facet of my artistic and aesthetic investigations. A context in which I am challenged to make the union of these ingredients appears intuitive. My work is driven to represent the elements of nature that surround us, creating a language that has universality. For me, beauty is stretched between elements that offer stimulating contradiction. Turning historical figurative references into a contemporary dialogue of social (and sometimes political) engagements. My process of making art is the conscious struggle between a purely personal expression and by the subjects that are universal to us all. Whether figurative or completely non-representational, this is the inspiration and backdrop of my work that I’m most interested in exploring.

 

JASON LEE GIMBEL
Known for his monumental figurative paintings, Jason Lee Gimbel renders full figure works through abstraction-expressionist brushwork and non-naturalistic colors. His instinctual approach, random use of color and mark making pushes figurative work to the edges of representation and, in some instances, into abstraction. These painted drawings breaking up the surface through a visual harmony that disrupts the partially outlining figures. Providing the viewer with a complex balance between the merger of the figure and background.

In addition to painting, Gimbel creates classically informed drawings. Often depicting the human figure with the skin removed to display the musculature. These écorché drawings borrow from Greek mythology, classical sculpture and traditional figure drawing. He incorporates visual metaphors that explore the ephemeral qualities of the yellowing and degrading newsprint on which they are drawn. There is a playful juxtaposition of these large scale drawings with larger than life size staples, magnets and thumb tacks. An optical perception is often associated with Alice in Wonderland Syndrome.

Past Exhibition

BEST OF 2017

Exhibition runs December 21st 2017 - January 13th 2018
OPENING RECEPTION & HOLIDAY PARTY
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21ST 2017 | 5PM–8PM
FEATURING WORK BY:

MARKS AARDSMA | PATRICIA AARON | MONICA AIELLO

TYLER AIELLO | ROBIN AULT | STEVEN BARIS | HEATHER BENTZ

TONIA BONNELL | PAUL BROKERING | JUDY CAMPBELL

TAIKO CHANDLER | YOONHEE CHOI | DIANE CIONNI

RIMAS CIURLIONIS | JODIE COOPER | LEOPOLDO CUSPINERA

HAZE DIEDRICH | MADELEINE DODGE | TONY ELLIS

CARLENE FRANCES | JANE GUTHRIDGE | HOWARD HERSH

MONROE HODDER | PAT ISAACS | JEFF JUHLIN

NANCY KOENIGSBERG | WENDY KOWYNIA | GAYLA LEMKE

JOHN MATLACK | YIANNI MELLIOS | SKYLER MCGEE

DIANE MCGREGOR | LEWIS MCINNIS | IAN MCLAUGHLIN

JEAN-PIERRE MORIN | CONOR O’DONNELL | REGULA ONSTAD

COREY POSTIGLIONE | LYNDA RAY | KAREN SCHARER

STEVE SHACHTMAN | BILL SNIDER | WILLIAM STOEHR

SHARON SWIDLER | JEFF WENZEL

CHARLES WOOLDRIDGE | JOHN WOOD

 

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

Press Release
  • Exhibition: BEST OF 2017
  • Showing: December 21st 2017 - January 13th 2018

Past Exhibition

WHITE

Exhibition runs November 9th 2017 - December 9th 2017


OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9TH 2017 | 5PM–8PM

EXHIBITION RUNS NOVEMBER 9TH THROUGH DECEMBER 9TH

 

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

 

    • Albus II
    • acrylic/mixed media on canvas
    • 24" x 24"
Press Release
  • Exhibition: WHITE
  • Showing: November 9th 2017 - December 9th 2017

Exhibition: WHITE
Showing: November 9th – December 9th

FEATURING WORK BY:

MARKS AARDSMA

TONIA BONNELL

YOONHEE CHOI

CARLENE FRANCES

NANCY KOENIGSBERG

WENDY KOWYNIA

GAYLA LEMKE

DIANE MCGREGOR

CORY POSTIGLIONE

SHARON SWIDLER

 

Past Exhibition

UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES

Exhibition runs September 28th 2017 - November 4th 2017


OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, October 13TH 2017 | 5PM–8PM


FEATURING WORK BY:

PATRICIA AARON
JEFF WENZEL
KAREN SCHARER
JOHN WOOD

JEAN-PIERRE MORIN

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

Press Release
  • Exhibition: UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES
  • Showing: September 28th 2017 - November 4th 2017

Exhibition: UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES
Showing: September 28th – November 4th
Opening Reception: October 13th, 5-8pm

Featuring SPACE Gallery Artists:
PATRICIA AARON | JEFF WENZEL
KAREN SCHARER | JOHN WOOD | JEAN-PIERRE MORIN

About the Artists:
PATRICIA AARON
Patricia Aaron, an established Denver artist, has been featured in numerous museum, airport, university, and gallery exhibitions during the past 28 years. During the first half of 2017, Delta Airlines (Atlanta, GA), Sun City Corporation (Kobe, Japan) and Hogan Lovells (Denver, CO) acquired her work for their corporate collections. Also during 2017, Aaron completed private commissions for Liberty Global (Denver, CO), the Museum of Outdoor Arts (Englewood, CO), and a private residence in Chicago, IL. Aaron’s work is held in several permanent museum collections.

JEFF WENZEL
Born in Denver in 1959, Wenzel lived in Colorado, California and Alaska as a youth, then returned to California for his postgraduate education. At the University of California at Berkeley, he pursued sculpture and painting, studying and working as a teaching assistant with the renowned abstract expressionist sculptor, Peter Voulkos. He also studied drawing and painting with Elmer Bischoff and Joan Brown, both expressionist painters identified with the Bay Area figurative movement. In 19813, Wenzel earned a Master of Arts degree and two years later a Master of Fine Arts degree from UC Berkeley. He went on to teach pottery and ceramic sculpture at various arts institutions in the bay area. Upon returning to Denver in 1988, in addition to his work in clay, Wenzel began working in large-scale paintings using mixed materials on paper and wood. His work is exhibited and collected nationally.

KAREN SCHARER
“I live and work in the Colorado Rockies at 7500 feet elevation, about 15 miles from the highest peaks of Rocky Mountain National Park. At times, the natural beauty that surrounds me is almost overwhelming. I exist immersed in a flood of constantly changing atmosphere, color, shapes, scents, and sounds. My work is created against that rich backdrop, and every painting is drawn from it. The palettes and forces of my environment demand to play a role; I have no choice but to comply.”

JOHN WOOD
“Two major artist residencies have had a significant influence on my work. In 2015, I was invited to spend three weeks at The Lake, the Morris Graves Foundation compound in Northern California. In January 2017, I spent a month at the Jentel Foundation near the Wyoming/Montana border. The intense connection with these two very different landscapes clearly appears in the work in this exhibit. Several paintings are in direct response to The Lake, others
are related to the winter landscape of Wyoming. Still other work here is a melding together of both of these influences.
I have been fortunate, after each of these residencies, to be offered additional time and space to work and develop ideas and images at Oakopolis Creativity Center in downtown Oakland, and at Eastman Lane Studios in Petaluma.”

JEAN-PIERRE MORIN
Jean-Pierre Morin’s sculptures speak to us of the materials and their possibilities. They also tell us about nature, space and man’s relationship with these elements: flames, leaves, flashes of lightening, stars, arborescence. Jean-Pierre Morin’s sculptural work has always been inspired by the elements of nature. Furthermore, his art is impregnated with the natural character of the elements through their form, color and seismic energy. His approach is based on the formal, poetic study of a telluric dimension of nature’s manifestations and their ontological resonance.

Past Exhibition

STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY

Exhibition runs August 18th 2017 - September 23rd 2017


OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, AUGUST 18TH 2017 | 5PM–8PM


FEATURING WORK BY:

JANE GUTHRIDGE
STEVEN BARIS
HOWARD HERSH
RIMAS CIURLIONIS

JODIE ROTH COOPER

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

Press Release
  • Exhibition: STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY
  • Showing: August 18th 2017 - September 23rd 2017

JANE GUTHRIDGE
“Moving from the midwest to the abundant sunlight and dramatic skies of Colorado has inspired my work. I have always been interested in looking closely at nature and find that the vast areas of wilderness in the West allow for a deeper contemplation of the ethereal qualities of the natural world — the rich colors of the land, the gentle curve of plants, the patterns of dappled light through trees. I abstract and reconfigure these patterns to convey the underlying rhythms and harmonies of our environment, creating a space that is somewhere between the real and the imagined.”

STEVEN BARIS
“I focus on how I represent space and how almost everything I do is implicated in some act of framing. To state the obvious, my paintings, drawings and videos are implicitly framed—that is, each is isolated from the surrounding space by their (mostly) rectilinear edges. And within these frames I have nested yet more frames, often geometrically modulated to suggest spatial projection. Yet actual space is never experienced freeze-framed, but rather it is apprehended through physical movement. It is in time that our bodies move through space and in time that the structure of the world is progressively disclosed.”

HOWARD HERSH
Howard Hersh is an artist who uses structural imagery as a metaphor for identifying ourselves in space and time. Additionally, structure is a template for social, intellectual, work and virtually every aspect of our daily lives.

Also, when Hersh reveals the construction of the paintings substrate, he is implying that while paintings are pictures of things, (illusions), they are also objects that stand on their own. In this way, structure serves not only as a metaphor, but as a physical presence, exerting itself as suc

JODIE ROTH COOPER
Jodie is an artist and designer, currently working and residing in Denver, Colorado. He earned his MArch from Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, MI. in 2013. Born in London in 1980, he moved to Saratoga Springs, NY in 1999 to attend Skidmore College and has lived, worked, and traveled in the United States ever since. Jodie’s undergraduate study was in metalsmithing, and 3D modeling.

The scale and scope of his work has increased over the years and his focus is now on sculpture and installation art along with architectural design. Although a great deal of satisfaction is derived from the design of functional objects and elements Jodie is most excited by blurring the lines of art and design in order to create elements, that not only serve a pedestrian function, but also serve to create memorable experience, whether physical or emotive. Jodie’s intention is to create an experience for others through his work and not impose a narrative.

RIMAS CIURLIONIS
The richly layered compositions of Rimas Čiurlionis’ oil paintings express the interaction and relation of color and form. It is difficult to determine from where one form or another arises, both rational and emotional are side by side. It can be a memory or a fascination or allusion, a manifestation of traditions or influences. Each person is an impulse to another. The same is true for an artwork. And the relation between the work and the viewer appears between them as in the meeting of two fields that are able to either augment the other or to destroy it.

“Art is a means by which we can, for an instant, stop the mind or move it more forcefully in a direction to which we are unaccustomed.” “A work is a reflection of my thought and aspiration which is rewritten and repeated day in and day out in a different quality, at times perceiving that it is the infinite, which joins me to everything, which changes me and which I am changing.”

Past Exhibition

ALTERNATIVE FACTS

Exhibition runs June 29th 2017 - August 12th 2017


OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY, JUNE 29TH 2017 | 5PM–8PM
CATERING PROVIDED BY SILVER SPOON


FEATURING WORK BY:

DIANE CIONNI
SKYLER MCGEE
IAN MCLAUGHLIN
TAIKO CHANDLER

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

  • Diane Cionni, Blue Devil, Acrylic Ink and Spray Paint on Panel, 30'' x 24''
  • Skyler McGee, Cocktail Attire, Encaustic, graphite, textile, ribbon and sequin on wood, 10'' x 10''
  • Ian McLaughlin, Home Around the Shoulder, Acrylic on Canvas, 36'' x 53''
Press Release
  • Exhibition: ALTERNATIVE FACTS
  • Showing: June 29th 2017 - August 12th 2017

 

SKYLER MCGEE
I vividly remember as a child, reading C.S Lewis’s book, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. I will forever recall the scene in which a young girl named Lucy curiously steps inside a wardrobe only to stumble into an unknown land. From the inside of the wardrobe, she gently caresses the surfaces of some old fur coats only to feel the fur give way to branches, a forest beyond. My work explores this moment. The moment of unexpected transitions in our every day lives. The places in which our habituated spaces: that of our homes, families, politics, spiritual and social selves are ever at the cusp of change. We are always in relationship with the world we have been given and the world we are making. 

My work depicts elements of the natural world alongside our own decorative arts: feathers, rocks and animals mingle with lace, sequins, and ornamental designs. Through combining and recontextualizing these motifs, I am probing the question “What is possible?” We frequently think of our own wardrobes as simply the clothes we possess: what is available to us. Yet Lucy found the enclosure of a wardrobe to be a place where something lay to be discovered, even created. What she expected to find gave way to a new way of being. My work is a visual exploration into the places where we might make something new of the things, sometimes hidden, that we already have.

IAN MCLAUGHLIN
I like the fall season. The fall season has always been poignant for me. The vivid colors of the leaves as they change, oxidize, and then die. The vivid reds against crisp blue skies. The color changes of the dying leaves is inspiring. It helps me paint. Color is a superpower. Or so I believe. This fall I felt a need and tremendous power-love to embrace vivid colors. So I did. It was great. I felt great again… I once covered my body in red paint and sang the American anthem while licking the fence on 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Challenging but doable. Do it! As long as you have 500 for bail you’re good. While I was in motion licking with conviction I spotted David Sedaris, Winona Ryder, Reggie Watts, and Al Franken doing the same. About twenty yards away or so. They smiled and waved without interrupting their licking of the fence. I thought this was kind of strange, but I’ve seen Stranger Things. I once met a kangaroo without any political associations or intentions. Curious. You’d think she’d have a side to pick. But she has a pouch. Her young are fortunate for this.

November this last year was particularly full in many ways. Vivid colors. Bountiful. My heart remembers feeling like a punching bag and buoy at the same time bobbing around. Watery with rhythm of waves and determination. Sadness too. Something had to be done. So I painted. I shouted and painted. I cried and painted. I danced and painted. I called friends and painted. I made calls and painted. I signed petitions and painted. I took a poo and painted. I meditated and painted. I made love and painted…


TAIKO CHANDLER
My work is a reaction to the natural and the artificial that surround us – a complex interaction that layers human construction onto natural evolution. The persistent tension between forces that both conflict and complement each other is the interface at which I work. 

I am fascinated by movement and fragmented forms. I seek to incorporate the transience and ephemeral nature of day-to-day life into my work, using patterns and layers of color to transform a space. Without knowing the ultimate destination, it is always exciting to see how my exploration shapes the final piece. 

Printmaking is the medium that most effectively liberates my ideas. It is intense and compelling. It generates fascinating, yet unpredictable results. This tension encourages the constant exploration of new vehicles for my art, whether through mixed media, painting, or three-dimensional sculpture and installations. My goal is to push the technical and material limits of printmaking as far as I can.


DIANE CIONNI
My work is inextricably entwined with and influenced by the time I spend in nature and many years of painting and drawing from direct observation.  I often incorporate details and materials from my daily life and interactions with other people into my studio processes. The black and white Rhizome Mind Map drawings, for example, are infused with ideas from people I have interviewed. I asked them to describe or draw for me their own personal concept of a universal invisible energy-field infrastructure that might possibly exist in the physical world.  In my studio practice, I combine many direct and indirect processes. For the work in this show, I used spray painting, digital manipulation, hand cut stencils, sketchbook drawings, printmaking, silkscreen and a vocabulary of painterly language from art history. I spend a lot of time studying and waiting for the next cue. The variety of materials (copperplate and polymer plate etching, watercolor transfer, acrylic paint and inks, bees wax and glue, to name a few) and the combinations of application techniques are intended to represent the lush, diversified and intricate nature of human experience in a complex world.

 

 

Past Exhibition

ALTERED LANDSCAPES

Exhibition runs May 18th 2017 - June 24th 2017

OPENING RECEPTION

THURSDAY, MAY 18TH 2017 | 5PM–8PM
CATERING PROVIDED BY THE PINES CATERING


FEATURING WORK BY:

ROBIN AULT
LEOPOLDO CUSPINERA
YIANNI MELLIOS
STEPHEN SHACHTMAN
SARAH WINKLER 

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

Press Release
  • Exhibition: ALTERED LANDSCAPES
  • Showing: May 18th 2017 - June 24th 2017

 

SARAH WINKLER
Sarah Winkler is fascinated by the environmental factors that shape the natural world and seek to imitate their destructive and constructive qualities in an artistic technique. She translates her experiences walking into landscapes and the subsequent geology research of these locations into small collages constructed from papers of magnified organic textures which she designs and prints. The collages are the working sketches from which she scales up and paints the finished pieces in acrylic on wood panel. The materials she uses are mixed with natural minerals such as marble, mica and iron oxide, cementing the narrative connection of the works to their subject. This year, she has been influenced by the gilded radiance of 13th Century altarpiece paintings from Florence and Venice. Their multi-panel storytelling format and use of rare pigments and gold leaf to create iconic imagery made her consider how surrounding landscapes out West are a sacred place of worship of a different nature.

YIANNI MELLIOS
Unlike many other artists self-taught Greek artist Yianni Mellios started working out of his living room. His inspiration has been the Mediterranean landscape of his homeland that is characterized by tones of lush earth colors and brilliant blues. As a paragliding pilot, he has captured images of flying over Greece’s dry mountains, hills and unforgettable stretches of beach coasts in the summer. In addition, the earth and its living creatures are a favorite subject. Yianni frequently applies paint in thick layers and then makes cuts into it to produce paradoxical images in an existential style, whether they depict animals or abstracts. One of his favorite methods is taking his aluminum skimmer and pulling translucent color across the surface, varying the pressure slightly as he moves along the panel. His techniques are constantly evolving and changing, as are the world and its inhabitants.

ROBIN AULT
A licensed architect, Ault has always considered himself an artist and has used painting and sketching as part of the design process. Inspired by the writings and work of Robert Motherwell, Cy Twombly and Robert Rauschenberg, Ault began devoting more time topainting in 1999. Since then, he has won awards with the Art Students League in Denver and the Curtis Arts and Humanities Center in Greenwood Village, received a public art commission from the City of Denver and shows regularly at Space Gallery in the Santa Fe Arts District in Denver. Named one of ENR’s ‘Top 20 under 40’ in 2012, Robin Ault is a visiting critic to the University of Colorado, College of Architecture and Planning.

“Painting quickly is a calculated act to stimulate the imagination. The object is knowing when the painting is done: when I’ve gone far enough. Sometimes I catch myself at just the right moment, or I walk away for a minute and realize it’s complete. Sometimes, after going too far, I wipe the surface clean and with a few strokes, suddenly there it is: a familiar but unanticipated presence that didn’t desert me after all.”-Robin Ault

LEOPOLDO CUSPINERA
For more than twenty-five years Leopoldo Cuspinera has been focused on the dynamic relationship between landscape and memory as a painter and academic. He says he does not want to lose his memory, so he uses many objects to trigger it. He takes what is already there, in different places, and transforms it. He has memories collected while on intense journeys, starting in his home country of Mexico; later in Europe, and currently in the United States. In this way, he gives the landscape back what it has given and what he needs to remember .

His paintings function as memorial artifacts, in some way they show veiled and unveiled segments of reality or aspects of life: fascinating, mysterious, complex and sometimes also dramatic. These segments permit him to observe details which otherwise would be lost in the immensity.

STEPHEN SHACHTMAN
Stephen Shachtman is constantly seeking to find something new and stimulating in either a physical or cerebral sense. The sculptures he creates circulate with aesthetics in contemporary forms with influences and inspiration from, science, architecture, and techniques. These inspirations inform him to create series’ with specific dialogue due to process‘s, dimensions, material usage, and overall presence.
Depending on the sculptural forms and concepts, a few primary materials employed are; copper, glass, and steel. Some of the elements in Stephen’s work range from; hammered surfaces which have an organic aesthetic while overall forms tend to have clean lines with a minimalistic approach yet are monolithic in presence. Some aesthetics are large-scale filigree in the metal that allows a viewer to see through the organic forms, while similar manipulation of glass elements are stacked to create positive and negative spaces. All pieces are affected by the orientation of light to unveil the personality of the sculptures, which create a 4th dimension of shadows and reflection as they emerge to produce an element of surprise.

Past Exhibition

HOLDING PATTERN

Exhibition runs April 7th 2017 - May 13th 2017

OPENING RECEPTION

FRIDAY, APRIL 7TH 2017 | 5PM–8PM
CATERING PROVIDED BY THE INVENTING ROOM

FEATURING WORK BY:

HEATHER BENTZ
LEWIS MCINNIS
CONOR O’DONNELL
REGULA ONSTAD

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

    • Seven Hundred Seven
    • acrylic on canvas
    • 70" x 42"
  • Conor O'Donnell, Talk to You, Pigment Ink on Paper, 40'' x 40''
  • Lewis McInnis, Pods, Oil on Canvas, 72'' x 60''
  • Regula Onstad, Kapok 6, Monotype on Paper, 18'' x 18''
Press Release
  • Exhibition: HOLDING PATTERN
  • Showing: April 7th 2017 - May 13th 2017

Holding Pattern, featuring SPACE Gallery artists Heather Bentz, Lewis McInnis, Conor O’Donnell, and Regula Onstad, explores the use of pattern to create rhythm and order, even in the midst of seeming chaos. Whether pattern is established via a traditional method, like repetition of a particular motif, or contrived with a slightly less conventional technique, Holding Pattern explores our need for orderliness and the many ways it can be achieved.

HEATHER BENTZ

The work of Heather Bentz investigates the interplay of relationships that occur in layered pattern through the transformation of ordinary found materials. Her process preserves the history of surface with clues to its meaning and content. As process is central to Bentz’s work, she begins with the pedestrian activity of gathering. Picking up dirty cardboard, paper scraps, and rusted metal pieces establishes the source materials for patterns in her work. In the studio, her process involves hand drawing and hand cutting stencils and templates, embracing imperfections of the hand and mis-measurements, while representing the inherent structure and repeat of pattern. Bentz’s templates are binary, simple, flattened guides which allow her to investigate the edges between objects and space.

LEWIS McINNIS

Lewis McInnis begins his paintings with visual ideas inspired by his daily interactions, often with architecture and landscape. Color, shadow, and scale can play a role in his inspiration, but often it’s the mundane things that influence him the most – the positive or accidental shapes found in architecture and other human-created geometric environments. McInnis typically begins with oil paint on canvas or small study gouaches on board, building up his paintings, layer by layer, working intuitively as his vision comes together. Charcoal or colored pencil might be used to break up the images or add boundaries. Geometric forms develop, are painted over, and reappear as the final composition comes in to focus. Each work develops as an individual statement, but often common themes appear from piece to piece. With the paint leading the way, color and composition are continually refined as his works progress. In the end, McInnis’ paintings are an effort to make order out of chaos with colors that have personal resonance and allow self expression.

CONOR O’DONNELL

Conor O’Donnell’s work is a cumulation of decisions, revisions and adjustments. His process begins with the same questions over and over again: What should I do today? What will it look like this time? O’Donnell is engaged with developing a modular way of working that incorporates both intuitive and conscious decision making. The making leads the way. His intention is to achieve a perceptual experience where tension exists between surface and illusory space. He seeks density and surprise and is interested in the moment a dialogue begins to emerge between form and space. 

REGULA ONSTAD

Growing up in Switzerland, Regula Onstad has always been captivated by form, color and architecture. Her career choices have been varied and have taken her from dental technician to interior designer to recognized pastry chef and on to fine artist. In addition to living in Switzerland, Onstad has also lived in multiple locations in the United States, including Denver and the Roaring Fork Valley, Colorado, Phoenix, Arizona, and New York City. In 2005, Onstad and her husband relocated to Santa Fe, New Mexico. It was then and there that she discovered her passion for fine arts. She enrolled in classes at the Santa Fe Community College Fine Arts Center and attended workshops with established local artists. Her adventure continues today…

 

Past Exhibition

VANTAGE POINT

Exhibition runs February 17th 2017 - April 1st 2017

 

OPENING RECEPTION:

FRIDAY, FEB. 17, 2017, 5PM–8PM

FEATURING WORK BY

TONY ELLIS | PAUL BROKERING

 

PRESENTING ARTMORE ON THE MEZZANINE

A JURIED EXHIBITION OF ARTMA ARTISTS

MADELEINE DODGE

PAT ISAACS

JOHN MATLACK

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

Press Release
  • Exhibition: VANTAGE POINT
  • Showing: February 17th 2017 - April 1st 2017
  • Opening Reception: FEBRUARY 17, 2017

The work featured in Vantage Point comes from the overlapping reality of two artists working in Colorado’s Front Range and Eastern plains stretching into Nebraska. You might be thinking of bucolic farms or Denver skyline stock photos. Don’t. Artists Tony Ellis and Paul Brokering are out to reawaken our experience of the commonplace with a visually powerful response to the question: What makes a photograph fine art? Setting the stage for Denver’s Month of Photography, Vantage Point will compel you to decide for yourself.

TONY ELLIS

Tony Ellis photographs are often mistaken for paintings. In his first exhibition at Space Gallery, Ellis elevates the remnants of Denver street art and urban grit into images that live somewhere between super and abstract realism.

A graduate of the West of England College of Art, Ellis works on Colorado wind energy projects. “At first I was taking photographs for fun, then my love of abstract art kicked in and I found myself discovering what I see as “accidental Rothkos” on abandoned buildings, old trains and rusted ranch equipment.”

After several exhibitions in the Midwest, Ellis’ work was acquired for the permanent collections of the Urban Institute for Contemporary Art in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 2014, and the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa, in 2016.

Ellis returned to Colorado two years ago to focus on Denver’s urban environment “and the ephemeral detail of deteriorating graffiti, altered by weather, paint or, better yet, attempts to remove it from places we walk by every day.”

PAUL BROKERING

Paul Brokering’s focus on buildings we might dismiss as mundane artifacts of rural life emerge as bold studies of artistic elements. “We drive by these buildings often and seldom take time to stop and discover the beauty of these structures that never change,” he offers. Brokering’s emphasis on shape, color, and repeating patterns of built environments draws us away from a building’s function to its powerful aesthetic.

Brokering, a native Coloradan and former resident and graduate of the University of Nebraska College of Architecture, returned to Denver ten years ago. Brokering admits that his passion for photography happily coexists with his career as an architect. The instant gratification of digital photography, combining the promise of more control of the creative process and his natural love of gadgets, were a powerful elixir pulling him towards photography.

Brokering has exhibited his photographic work in Colorado and Nebraska since 2005. This is his second exhibition of abstract images at Space Gallery.

 

Past Exhibition

The Best of 2016

Exhibition runs December 15th 2016 - February 12th 2017

 ARTISTS RECEPTION DEC. 15TH, 2016, 5PM-8PM

Marks Aardsma | Pat Aaron | Monica Aiello | Tyler Aiello | Kate Beck | Tonia Bonnell Taiko Chandler | Nancy Charak | Diane Cionni | Jeff Curry | Carlene Frances | Karen Freedman Michael Gadlin | Amber George | Jason Lee Gimbel | Jane Guthridge | Howard Hersh | Jeff Juhlin |Nancy Koenigsberg | Joanne Mattera | Michael McClung | Diane McGregor | Lisa Purdy Mike Rand | Lynda Ray | Jodie Roth Cooper | Betsy Stewart | William Stoehr | Sarah Winkler
  • Ian McLaughlin, Heartichoke X-Ray Big Open Secret, 30"x30", Acrylic and fabric on panel
Press Release
  • Exhibition: The Best of 2016
  • Showing: December 15th 2016 - February 12th 2017

Past Exhibition

Expanding the Dialogue: Part Two

Exhibition runs October 5th 2016 - November 12th 2016
FEATURING:

PATRICIA AARON | MONROE HODDER

HAZE DIEDRICH | STEPHEN SHACHTMAN

ARTISTS RECEPTION: OCTOBER 5TH, 2016, 6PM-9PM
REFRESHMENTS PROVIDED BY FOODIE CALL CATERING
READ MICHAEL PAGLIA’S REVIEW OF THE SHOW IN WESTWORD!

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

  • Patricia Aaron, Electric Spring
    • Inland Sea
    • oil and acrylic on canvas
    • 60 x 60 inches
    • The Endless Commute
    • oil on canvas
    • 60" x 60"
    • SOLD
  • Stephen Shachtman, Red Monolith
Press Release
  • Exhibition: Expanding the Dialogue: Part Two
  • Showing: October 5th 2016 - November 12th 2016

Expanding the Dialogue: Part Two features Colorado women currently working in abstraction, whose work has earned them a position of prominence within the Colorado art community. Women artists have historically been undervalued and underrepresented in the art world. This show aims to question and counteract this centuries-old trend, while simultaneously celebrating the expressive and direct nature of abstract art. Presented in conjunction with Women in Abstract Expressionism at the Denver Art Museum and Colorado Women in Abstraction at the Center for Visual Art.

Part 2 (October 5th – November 12th) features bold, expressive works from Patricia Aaron and Monroe Hodder, complimented by a collection from Haze Diedrich.

PATRICIA AARON

My recent series of new paintings, On Ice, was inspired by the nearly five weeks I spent in the country of Iceland as an artist resident this past spring. It was an electrifying experience.

I traveled non-stop around the island, venturing into and around lava tablelands, volcano fields, and boiling mud lakes, off-roading to the top of glaciers, traversing narrow one-lane bridges to see icebergs, and wading into the freezing icy-blue waters of the Northern Atlantic.

Each day, my hiker’s backpack was overflowing with mementos, including black beach rocks, bird feathers, fish lines, and driftwood. Since my return home to Denver, I have been hunkered down in my studio painting my favorite places and memories through the summer and into the early fall.

MONROE HODDER

Painting for me is like a flight of reckless abandonment; at the same time, it’s like an intense game of chess. To be spontaneously and fully open to experience – just submerging oneself in it – and also to exercise focused discernment is a precarious proposition at best. But artists often choose the steep path and relish the painful climb. This task is made more difficult by the very nature of creativity, as it seeks to improve upon itself at every turn. The turn I have taken in my recent paintings is to move further away from the tradition of abstract expressionism, that seminal explosion that put American art on the world stage in the fifties. In my new work, I am seeking a radiant energy that allows for spontaneity, lightness, freedom, playfulness, and delight.

For me, decisions about color are always what come first. Color creates the tonality of my work. I have chosen to veer off the path of strong traditional colors.   Instead I use dusky pastels, florescent pink and chartreuse, allowing textures and sensations of color to be in conversation with each other. These colors could seem too buoyant for the viewer who looks for a more subdued and serious palette. Yet, there is a sharp edge in the surface shapes that cuts like a scythe through the murky pastels below.

Space in my new work appears transparent. Moving away from  modernist flatness, I  create visible layers that allow one to see into the painting as a dimensional cube. Each painting begins with  30” x 30” quadrants of four acrylic colors. I work on top of these quadrants with layers in acrylic and then oil, playing on the change in quality between the two media. The final layer is the arcs and sprays that appear to come forward and give definition and movement to the work.  These arcs seem to have floated free from my earlier stripe paintings, as if nothing ever really gets left behind. This structure allows me to create a pool of light and energy inside the painting that floats through transparent layers.

This transparency is fraught with pitfalls as each layer is visible. This year I have often tossed whole paintings in the trash if they did not blend through the open web to create layered cadences. As a friend and writer said to me, “Your new work is like looking through clear seas to find bright coral floating far below the surface”.

I often think of astrological events when working on my paintings.  One work is named Transit of Venus, the tiny round shadow made when Venus passes directly in front of the sun.  Contemplating celestial events can take us to a new awareness of movement and time.  A great abstract painting may do the same.  Artists engage in many different aspects of reality. I am drawn to the distant spheres of the abstract.

HAZE DIEDRICH

This series of work is based on observations from my daily experiences of living in Colorado. From my deck I see the whole Front Range and the changing colors based on light in the sky, in the water, and in the air. While skiing, hiking, and biking, I see the ever-changing light play with the mountains, streams, and trees. As an Abstract Artist, I am intrigued with how I interpret these observations. Some of these paintings are more representative than a lot of my previous work and it has been an evolving process to capture direct observations in an abstract format. I think abstract art allows for the universality of individual stories and observations to be presented in a way that allows the viewer to relate to the subject matter on a more personal note.

My working methodology is to use palette knives and rubber shapers for the vast majority of the oil paint application process. This process is refined with some additional brush work, followed by sanding and scraping through previous levels of paint. More paint is applied and then ultimately a few glazing layers tie all the paint films back together.

 

Past Exhibition

Expanding the Dialogue: Part One

Exhibition runs August 18th 2016 - October 1st 2016

 ARTISTS RECEPTION: AUGUST 18, 2016 6PM-9PM

TONIA BONNELL | TAIKO CHANDLER
CARLENE FRANCES | JANE GUTHRIDGE
NANCY KOENIGSBERG | WENDY KOWYNIA | SOPHIA DIXON DILLO

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

  • Sophia Dixon Dillo, Untitled
  • Taiko Chandler, Similarities Attract detail
  • Nancy Koenigsburg, Forest Pond
  • Tonia Bonnell, Unnatural Boundaries 4
  • Wendy Kowynia, Line Drawing 10
  • Jane Guthridge, Reflected Light (Detail)
  • Carlene Frances, TC #4 Blue and Orange
Press Release
  • Exhibition: Expanding the Dialogue: Part One
  • Showing: August 18th 2016 - October 1st 2016

Expanding the Dialogue: Part One features Colorado women currently working in abstraction, whose work has earned them a position of prominence within the Colorado art community. Women artists have historically been undervalued and underrepresented in the art world. This show aims to question and counteract this centuries-old trend, while simultaneously celebrating the expressive and direct nature of abstract art. Presented in conjunction with Women in Abstract Expressionism at the Denver Art Museum and Colorado Women in Abstraction at the Center for Visual Art.

Part One (August 18th – October 1st) features subtle, ethereal pieces from Tonia Bonnell, Taiko Chandler, Sophia Dixon Dillo, Carlene Frances, Jane Guthridge, Nancy Koenigsberg, and Wendy Kowynia.

TONIA BONNELL

Using repetitive marks to develop my images, I explore the concept that complexity can arise from the interaction of many simple components – examples include flocks of birds flying in unison, molecules and microscopic particles forming our visible world, and separate notes forming a musical composition. In these drawings, the individual marks – like notes of music – gain complexity when composed and layered. Drawn on the front and back of the drafting vellum, the marks appear to merge into a fluid form while remaining separated by varying amounts of space. The thin, translucent drawing surface allows the form to appear whole while also acting as a barrier: marks are either on the front or back but cannot occupy the space of the drafting vellum. Remnants of erased marks blur the boundary of this barrier and add to the illusion of depth or volume. The resulting images invite the viewer to draw closely, inspecting the manner in which the marks interact with the surface.

TAIKO CHANDLER

My work explores different aspects of both natural and artificial life—the colors, shadows, lines, and textures that I see every day. I like to take photos of that life, but printmaking offers me a more expressive medium by which I can transfer my impressions to paper. I am fascinated by the patterns that I see in dew drops, flowers, refracting light, even rust, decay, and debris. My work reflects these patterns of creation and erosion. Within printmaking, I particularly like monotype because it is a single impression that is not repeatable—the outcome can never be completely controlled or predicted. Within this highly organic process, I enjoy blending the colors, and designing and cutting the stencils that I use to subtract and add to the space. This tension between chaos and control is what makes this medium so challenging, but also so exciting. I love the whole process—some of it planned, but most of it spontaneous.

SOPHIA DIXON DILLO

I am fascinated with how light can be both visible and invisible at the same time. Light is always present, yet not always seen. My works play with this internal contradiction in the nature of light. The result is a fusing of the materiality of the art object with the immateriality of light, creating a multivalent visual experience that subtly changes as the viewer moves.

I am drawn to non-objective abstraction because it tends to strip away the layers of meaning in which our everyday lives are embedded. Non-objective images emphasize a space that exists before labeling, before thinking. Unobstructed by familiar icons, a bodily felt dialogue between the viewer and the work of art then might arise more easily.

The Emergence Series are ‘essentialized drawings.’ Marks are incised into the surface of thick watercolor paper. When lit from above, the incisions create a play of light and shadow on the newly three-dimensional surface. The pieces are intimate, requiring the viewer to come close to see the interplay between light and form emerge from the empty plane of the white paper. The all-over patterns encourage the eye to alternate from the whole to the particular and back again.

CARLENE FRANCES

My work emerges from the aesthetic power of Asian design elements. I explore non-objective line, symbolic circles (enso), squares, and the relationship among color, content and opposites. It reflects the juxtaposition of complexities versus simplicities;large simplistic planes of glazed luminous color fused with shapes and complex areas of spontaneous gestural lines. I seek to eliminate the unnecessary so the necessary may speak. The result is the harmonizing of ostensible opposites (yin& yang); therefore, creating balance.

This body of work is particularly important to me. It is a challenge to leave the comfort and seduction of intense color, while finding new ways to communicate with the viewer. David Batchelor said it so well;“luminous grey palettes can be potentially as rich and complex as other colors, yet in their own way, very unlike other colors. The grey makes the luminous more luminous and the luminous makes the grey so much greyer.”In this series Surface, my paintings emanate more than a visible or tactile outward appearance. Every stroke, every layer, emerges and contributes to the exterior and interior surface, occasionally revealing itself to the viewer.

JANE GUTHRIDGE

My work is inspired by the abundant sunlight and dramatic vistas of Colorado.I have always been interested in looking closely at nature and find that the vast areas of wilderness in the West allow for a deeper pondering and contemplation of the ethereal qualities of the natural world — the rich colors of the land, the geometry of plants, the patterns of dappled light through trees. My work is a link to nature in a society often surrounded by an urban environment. Studies have found what I have always felt to be true – that immersion in the natural world brings peace, joy, the ability to meet life’s challenges with a positive attitude and to see the interconnectedness of all things. Nature offers a rich complexity of ever changing patterns that appeal directly to aspects of our human consciousness.

I am interested in simulating the changing light in nature and the transcendent experiences light creates. I use a variety of translucent materials that bend and refract, obscure and reveal, diffusing light in various ways. Many of the colors you see are the result of seeing one color through another. As the light surrounding the work changes throughout the day, the work will change as well. I think this constant change is a beautiful metaphor for life.

NANCY KOENIGSBERG

For the past twenty years Koenigsberg’s work has been concerned with interlocking lines and the spaces they form. She creates a sense of weightlessness and luminescence by the manipulation of narrow gauge industrial wire, exploring the contradiction between metal elements known for their strength and durability and the delicacy of the textiles which are created. These lace-like layers of nets allow for transparency and the passage of light and the formation of shadows. In other works the nets are thickly layered and become almost opaque. Lines cross and re-cross to create a complex fabric and tangle of shadows. The objects appear fragile, but she seeks to maintain their strength through the use of these materials.

WENDY KOWYNIA

My interests lie in the iterative nature of time and existence: the accretion of moment upon moment, memory upon memory, thread upon thread. When a series of similar actions accrete they construct more complex patterns.  My engagement in the act of accretion is an opportunity to connect with and consider the ideas and activities that underlie and construct our complex realities.

My favorite tool is a simple floor loom. The loom provides for a specific quality of exploration: the intersection of the horizontal and the vertical.  It is a grid where interactions take place between the spiritual and the material, the seen and unseen.

The Line Drawing: Ode to Agnes series is based on the grid structures of Agnes Martin’s ‘On a Clear Day’ series of prints (1973).  Martin dedicated her practice to the exploration of these essential grids. Like her, I find that a simple structure or logarithm generates infinite possibilities.

 

Past Exhibition

ABSTRACTED LANDSCAPES: FOUR WORLD VIEWS

Exhibition runs July 1st 2016 - August 13th 2016
RECEPTION: JULY 1, 2016  6-9 PM
LEOPOLDO CUSPINERA | JEFF JUHLIN | YIANNI MELLIOS | SARAH WINKLER

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

  • Sarah Winkler: Red Rocks
  • Jeff Juhlin: Stratum #21
  • Yianni Mellios: Scolix
  • Leopoldo Cuspinera: Walkers
Press Release
  • Exhibition: ABSTRACTED LANDSCAPES: FOUR WORLD VIEWS
  • Showing: July 1st 2016 - August 13th 2016
  • Opening Reception: JULY 1, 2016

LEOPOLDO CUSPINERA: MEXICO

For more than twenty years I have been focused on the dynamic relationship between landscape and memory as a painter and academic. I think because I do not want to lose my own memory, I use many objects to trigger it. I have taken what is already there, in different places, and I transform it. I have memories collected while on an intense journey, starting in my home country of Mexico; later in Europe, and currently in the United States. In this way, I give the landscape back what it has given me and what I need to remember.

My paintings function as memorial artifacts, in some way they show veiled and unveiled segments of reality or aspects of life: fascinating, mysterious, complex and sometimes also dramatic. These segments permit me to observe details which otherwise would be lost in the immensity.

Because of the nature of the technique used, the form emerges from the material itself: water and vegetable fibers. The technique is based on ancient paper fabrication: the Japanese Washi and the Mexican Papel Amate. I have transformed these techniques by adding resins and other materials such as recycled paper pulp, oils, chalk, charcoal, gold, silver, and bronze.

The paintings have been created in an intuitive way; nevertheless there is an underlying imaginary structure that supports them, revealing the logic in the resulting forms. The structure follows an essential movement:
For each descending line there is a corresponding ascending line. Light returns us to the Divine Light.
Human beings reach out to that which is immaterial by means of that which is material.

JEFF JUHLIN: UNITED STATES

Often we see only the surface of things when in reality there are many levels and layers holding artifacts, histories and clues that hint of something curious and magical lurking beneath the surface waiting to be discovered, excavated and explored.

My work is about discovery and the hint of possibility. It’s about the layers and strata of things substantive, imagined, physical and implicit. I work by accumulating layers of material, images and color that make up the whole of a work, then I go back in and explore, excavate, expose, obscure.

Although I use various materials and mediums to create these works, encaustic is often the primary medium. It’s luscious translucent luminosity suits this process.

YIANNI MELLIOS: GREECE

Yianni frequently applies paint in thick layers and then makes cuts into it to produce paradoxical images in an existential style, whether they depict animals or abstracts. One of his favorite methods is taking his aluminum skimmer and pulling translucent color across the surface, varying the pressure slightly as he moves along the panel. His techniques are constantly evolving and changing, asare the world and its inhabitants.

SARAH WINKLER: ENGLAND

I seek out geologically interesting landscapes. It might be a specific rock formation, mountain range or natural wonder. I conceptualize a collection of work by relating the action of painting to the geological process of erosion and formation. The materials I use are themselves mixed with natural minerals such as marble, mica and iron oxide, cementing the narrative connection of the works to their subject. Seasons and dramatic weather in my mountainous Colorado surroundings also affect my creative directions. I seem to get hooked on a color palette for a while and work with it until organically shifting to another area of the spectrum.

Each painting is the final product of an extensive method that begins with sketches and photographs of landscapes I have visited on my walks. These visuals are translated into collages using paper that I have designed using an experimental process of my own making. The collages are then further developed into highly stylized paintings, which are created by applying acrylic paint to large wood panels. Each panel is sanded and treated to achieve a satin sheen, which highlights the multiplicity of textures, layers and spatial depths.

I am fascinated by the environmental factors that shape the natural world, and seek to imitate their destructive and constructive qualities in an artistic technique. I experiment with solvents, paints, carving implements and sanding tools to mimic the kinetic processes of erosion and deposition, as well as the physical forces of wind, water and temperature. By applying paint in this way, I am creating a history of gestures and actions that form into naturalistic abstracted landscapes with painted geological textures.

The work lies at the boundaries of abstraction and realism, modernism and minimalism. The paintings are often described as “Dreamy”as they evoke sensations of fantasy or partial reality. I intended the imagery to be at once familiar, but to carry an air of play and human curiosity about the natural world as if your discovering a place for the first time.

Past Exhibition

MODERN STRUCTURE

Exhibition runs May 19th 2016 - June 25th 2016
RECEPTION: MAY 19TH, 2016 6PM-9PM
HOWARD HERSH | KRISTA SVALBONAS | STEVEN BARIS
FRANK T MARTINEZ  |  JODIE ROTH COOPER

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

REFRESHMENTS PROVIDED BY ALL LOVE CATERING
Press Release
  • Exhibition: MODERN STRUCTURE
  • Showing: May 19th 2016 - June 25th 2016
  • Opening Reception: THURSDAY MAY 19TH, 2016 6PM-9PM

HOWARD HERSH

My artwork is a reflection of my personal philosophy. An overriding theme is that of no separation. Whether between the natural and the man-made, different cultures, religions, or nationalities; I believe everything is connected and inter-related. As my work is visual, containing words only in the titles, it has become my challenge and goal to communicate this philosophy of connectedness.

I’ve decided that the way to cut through the illusion of separation is to “peel back the layers” to reveal the essence of things. This is not to say that I’m eliminating complexity and diversity. The essence is inclusive and contains all that is.

In my latest series of paintings, entitled “Pulse”, I’m suggesting that the essence of life is energy. And energy is not static, it pulses and vibrates. In a more contemporary context, think of computer code, which consist of nothing but ones and zeroes. Electric current, our heartbeat, sound; it all vibrates, pulsing, to create life.

KRISTA SVALBONAS

Krista Svalbonas is a mixed-media artist based in Chicago. She holds a BFA degree in photography and design from Syracuse University and an interdisciplinary MFA degree in photography, sculpture, and design from SUNY New Paltz. Benefiting from this extensive training in a wide range of media, Svalbonas experiments with traditional materials in unexpected ways. She is heavily influenced by her urban environment and focuses on spatial relationships and architecture when developing abstract pieces and installations.

Svalbonas exhibits throughout the United States, including recent and upcoming solo shows at Space Gallery in Denver and the Spartanburg Art Museum in South Carolina. She has exhibited at the Dairy Center of the Arts, Colorado; Kenise Barnes Fine Art, Matteawan Gallery, Opus Projects, The Painting Center, Trestle Gallery, ISE Cultural Foundation, and BWAC, New York; Watchung Art Center and George Segal Gallery, New Jersey; Monterey Peninsula Art Gallery and Wall Gallery, California; and Tubac Center For The Arts, Arizona. She is in the permanent collection of the Cesis Art Museum in Latvia. Svalbonas is a recipient of a Bemis Fellowship, and of residencies from Cooper Union, Vermont Studio Center, and the New Arts Program. She is currently a lecturer in photography at Columbia College.

STEVEN BARIS

I am drawn to spaces that are engineered to be placeless: from interiors to landscapes–spaces that are highly disorienting and are precisely designed to be passed through as quickly and efficiently as possible. Think airports, expressways and lobbies. Lately I’ve been frequenting similar kinds of spaces, no less enigmatic and no less banal: those sprawling tracts dotted about the edges of the cities and suburbs, characterized by the clotted networks of expressways and county roads and, most importantly to me, those massive, horizontal structures variously called distribution centers or logistics centers.

These largely overlooked yet high functioning landscapes disclose many of the same spatial tensions and enigmas that I address in my art making. At the heart of both lies an amalgam of space and structure, both largely determined by seen and unseen geometries. In my paintings and projects I conjure a sense of space that is highly elastic and ambiguous. I aim to juggle and confound those key oppositions that underpin spatial coherence: basic binaries such as close-distant, container-contained, surface-depth, opaque-transparent, and so on.

I never really know the true nature of my fascinations and certainly not these forays (actual and artistic) into various states of disorientation and dislocation. Yet I feel we are experiencing unprecedented transformations of our built and virtual environments, and so ultimately these works are neither more nor less than my playful stabs at a better understanding.

JODIE ROTH COOPER

Jodie is currently based in Denver at TBD Studio, a work space formed in collaboration with Tenzin Phuntsok and Jordan Gravely. As well as working on his own solo projects, he works with Jordan Gravely as Ant Box Design Build and James Crockett as Double D Design. All projects shown on this site were designed, fabricated and installed in a fluid process by the creators. Although a great deal of satisfaction is derived from the design of functional objects and elements Jodie is most excited by blurring the lines of art and design in order to create elements that not only serve  a pedestrian function, but also serve to create memorable experience, whether physical or emotive.

FRANK T MARTINEZ

Since making his debut with Plus Gallery in 2004, Denver native Frank T. Martinez has earned the reputation as one of the leading abstract painters of the last decade. His work has been featured in juried exhibitions and regional group shows of note including the Emmanuel Gallery’s “Five Prominent Denver Galleries Featuring Five Works of Art,” (2005), the Rocky Mountain Biennial at the Fort Collins Museum of Contemporary Art (2006 – Juror’s second place award, Juror Bill Wiley), “Pattern Recognition” (2007) at the Foothills Art Center in Golden, “Silent Films and Bedroom Paintings” at the LAB at Belmar, curated by esteemed MCA Denver director Adam Lerner, and most recently “Beyond Blue” at the McNichols Civic Center Building in conjunction with the City of Denver. His work has been acquired by numerous individuals and collectors of note, and has been placed in distinct corporate collections such as First Western Trust, Regis University, Denver’s Glass House and most recently the City of Denver for the recently completed Justice Center on Colfax.  Martinez was featured in the 2013 Starz Denver Film Festival trailer series “Paint the Town Red” in anticipation of his fifth solo exhibition with Plus Gallery “Fluid,” which was one of the gallery’s most succesful exhibitions of the last five years.

VIRTUAL TOUR: 

 

Past Exhibition

reMarkable

Exhibition runs April 7th 2016 - May 14th 2016
RECEPTION: APRIL 7TH, 2016 6PM-9PM
ARTIST TALK WITH PHILIP TARLOW 5:30PM-6PM

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

Refreshments provided by Relish Catering and Events

 

Press Release
  • Exhibition: reMarkable
  • Showing: April 7th 2016 - May 14th 2016
  • Opening Reception: THURSDAY APRIL 7TH, 2016 6PM-9PM

MICHAEL GADLIN | SANGEETA REDDY

SKYLER MCGEE | JUDY CAMPBELL | PHILIP TARLOW

ARTIST TALK WITH PHILIP TARLOW 5:30PM-6PM

Refreshments provided by Relish Catering and Events

 

MICHAEL GADLIN

I look at art as a much bigger and exciting concept than that which relies on possessing a pleasant visual identity. A picture that merely stands on the limitations of something easy-on-the-eye. For me painting has been a tool to explore what I do not yet know.

The act of making art [process] is setup for those who have a deep desire to be challenged and bring to light important questions.

Identifying intelligent problems that can only be quenched visually, through a cogent body of work. I feel by taking this visual approach seriously, I’m able to articulate and express clearer than my words can ever say. My interest in unexpected (visual) relationships from an abstract point of view, expresses a common universal dialogue that crosses social and racial boundaries. Exhibiting both intuitive responsiveness and an element of contrivance delivers an understanding toward the importance of serious practice and critique in a historical context. This communication through thoughtful interpretation and expression seems critical to me. In addition, accepting that which can challenge everything you know is an important idea in the search for meaning. Merely declaring yourself as an artist isn’t enough. An honest examination of the work is determined by the sum of two things; that which you do not know, and that which you practice. I’m dedicated to a serious and rigorous practice of observation that has the ability to make the art relevant in any arena.

PHILIP TARLOW

Collages in mixed media on paper and canvas, mostly based upon small plein air paintings from a local creek and inspired by 11th c. chinese calligrapher huang tingjian.

“….confusable, unstable images that switch identities, like ludwig wittgenstein’s famous duck-rabbit figure, but confusable, unstable images that refuse to be claimed linguistically for identification, ….something seen only fleetingly or under obscure circumstances.”   john elderfield on dekooning

“homeless representation….a plastic and descriptive painterliness that is applied to abstract ends, but which continues to suggest representational ones.”  clement greenberg on dekooning, 1962

 

SKYLER MCGEE

Skyler McGee paints to locate herself. Location is not only an established place; it is also a network of relationships to be traversed and negotiated. To live somewhere, especially to create a sense of home, requires living with and through relationships to the soil, to birds and feral cats, to canned soup and shower curtains, to neighbors, strangers, streets, and sunlight.

Working in and across multiple mediums, her work belongs on the borders. She explores the spaces between disciplines, between materials, and between environments, depicting places where relationships cannot be assumed but must be crafted, developed, and sustained in all their threatening and beautiful complexity.

Rocks, insects, and flora meet unrecognizable forms, abstracted landscapes, and objects from other settings. The interplay between the forms and colors are neither serene nor aggressive. Rather, the work inhabits the experienced space of possibility, the spaces and spacing in between chaos and stillness, the settings before and after, in which we may live towards a home. The artwork maps our personal and communal lives as they unfold in the midst of ecological, cultural, and communal transformations.

Trained in oil painting and mixed-media work, she draws from the Abstract Expressionists and Post-Impressionists, employing domestic imagery as well as gesture and ornament. Across and through the various mediums, she probes the fissures—openings and wounds—that mark our efforts to find or craft some understanding and experience that this life and this world can be, also, a home for us.

SANGEETA REDDY

Life cycles have a way of re-occurring.  Only, they never return in perfect circles, but in wobbly, misshapen ellipses, unexpectedly, unpredictably, and yet with a certain rhythm.  The shape has always been present in my work from the earliest tentative explorations into abstract shapes.

Monotypes are everything that is direct, spontaneous, unexamined, unbidden, and confident, gushing on their own, in that moment when creating is merely a channel for something beyond the conscious.   The collage is everything the monotype is not: thoughtful, considered and meandering; it is what seeps quietly beneath the surface, conscious and aware.  But above all, it is the thinnest of skins – fragile, absorbent and tenacious.

For this new body of work that I have come to think of the ellipse series, I worked back into the monotypes.  In a careful, deliberative process, I laid down thin skins of tissue, of paper, of cloth, making marks, erasing, red-defining, re-aligning, sometimes with charcoal and paint, sometimes thick, sometimes, thin; transparent and opaque.  The more I concealed, the more what was revealed became mysterious and charged.  To heighten the contemplative quality of these collages, I superimposed a neutral palette on the vivid inks and active surface of the underlying monotype.

CHARLES WOOLDRIDGE

As we are taught history, in a two-dimensional timeline, do we only see the leaves blown across our path, not knowing from what tree and what roots they come from? If we are taught to recognize the greater sphere around the path, the totality of creation, knowing the different trees and objects in such a way that our thoughts become the greater mass before us, we are indeed lucky. That is the artist’s task- to enable us to embrace thelarger view, to take on a greater sense of gravity than the mere juxtaposition of the rock next to the path, making something, finding the connection, physically building something with the rock, the trees and the fallen leaves. Constructing with elements that are only limited by-products of history itself.

JUDY CAMPBELL

My paintings begin with texture – collaged paper, cloth, canvas and more. I then block out geometric shapes of circles, lines, squares. I randomly choose my paint colors and as I drip, splatter, rub and scratch the layers become more organic. Each painting becomes a journey using texture, color and composition. At the end of that journey, the painting comes to its own conclusion.

 

VIRTUAL TOUR: 

Past Exhibition

RECONFIGURED

Exhibition runs January 15th 2016 - February 20th 2016
OPENING RECEPTION JANUARY 15TH, 2016  6PM-9PM
FEATURING:

WILLIAM STOEHR |  MARK SINK

JASON LEE GIMBEL

MICHAEL RAND | TRAVIS PARR

 

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

Press Release
  • Exhibition: RECONFIGURED
  • Showing: January 15th 2016 - February 20th 2016
  • Opening Reception: FRIDAY JANUARY 15TH, 2016 6PM-9PM

William Stoehr

Starting with a vague or elusive expression and an uncertain context, I hope to provoke viewers into visually completing my portraits with their own more complete and ideal mental image and to then create the narrative based on their own experience and feelings.

We are attracted to faces – it is our nature. If I fill the canvas with a big face then there is little room for external leading context. I think that the large size and closely cropped image creates an elevated sense of intimacy.  Searching for meaning, viewers may turn inward to create a subjective reality.

If I engage you with eyes then I can also start to do other things peripherally with line and color. I can color outside of the lines and your mind will resolve it. Vague and scribbled outlines and graphic vectors become part of a recognizable whole while a hint of “unreal” complimentary and equal value color causes the eyes to seem life-like. I experiment with the amount and type of information required to evoke an image and to find those characteristics that cause the viewer to emotionally respond to the portrait.

All of my paintings start with a live model and then I work from reference photographs.  I have developed a practice of deliberately reacting to less than controlled and/or accidental incidences.

I use a limited pallet of acrylic paint. I vary the coverage, spraying varnish between layers and then scrubbing, scraping, scratching or sanding the surface while applying a variety of marks – strokes, dots and other adjustments.  I try not to differentiate between my drawing and painting.

These paintings tend to be layers of fresh starts. I believe I might have a finished face one day but soon I brush, flow or spill paint all over the surface, leaving traces – a template to guide the next iteration.

It seems that whenever I think I have a new idea I find someone who did it, sometimes, centuries ago. I am not interested in imitation. I am interested in continuing their inquiries. I consider myself to be a traditional artist in search of ways to build on the past. In the end I am attempting to facilitate alternative emotional experiences through the use of changing and alternate points of view, engaging gaze, uncertain context, elusive emotion and naturalistic cues.

Mark Sink

For me ‚ Art is an attempt at the sublime. Great images talk to you and keep talking through the years, never growing old.  I am a gushy romantic and I still believe in beauty. I like work that explores. I am from the old world of photographic craft in silver printing, platinum and other alternative processes so those are near and dear to me. The nude – magical, erotic, aesthetic – has been modeled and painted since prehistory.

Today the nude is a lot of different things to a lot of different people. The nude in general, in America, is in a very victorian suppressed state. Debates seem to be increasing around artists and photographers and their nude subjects. Objectification and the male gaze is at the center of the feminist march. Conservative society in the other corner. I am not going to open that door here but I ask.. can one be an object and subject at the same time? I say yes . Can one be simultaneously exposed and empowered? I say yes. Also I believe a great concept can win everyone over.

More simplistic, I like collaborations with the model. You can feel the open collaboration in the picture even with sexually charged images. It feels honest and real. Its hard to put in words but when a model is sharing in creation of the image that is when magic happens. Super images come from a super collaborative muse. Great artist muse/ models through history come to mind, Evelyn Nesbit and Rudolf Eickemeyer,  Kiki and ManRay, Clara Bow, Betty Paige, and of course Marilyn Monroe.They made history. Celebrated artist models are rare today.

Mike Rand

My ceramic art links to the old. It takes art traditions and mutates them into personal visions. Two keys to understand the thinking behind the way my art moves from traditional to the new come from Leonardo Da Vinci, who wrote that: “man should become universal”, and that one needs to learn as much as possible about as many things as possible too truly understand the world – the Gestalt. Using these related approaches I push the boundaries of what ceramics, as a medium, should become. While linked to traditions past, the ideas and process used in my work stretch the materials’ chemical properties and limits to open potentials for new ceramic aesthetics.

One needs to venture beyond the safety of boundaries to see what is really possible with a medium. This is an uncertain endeavor. It calls up the idea that the opposite ends of the spectrum of fantasy-reality can exist at a single time within the piece of ceramic art. Using a thought and production process that brings my beliefs in scientific studies into the reference frame of ceramic arts provides clearer focus. Out of the uncertainties of the wood kiln’s fiery space of chaotic forces I see my work in the “fantasy” of the viewer’s internal world and the “reality” of the surrounding external universe.

Jason Lee Gimbel

Known for his life size figurative paintings, Jason Lee Gimbel’s work explores his ideas and discoveries through the use of the human form, directly and at times indirectly. Often incorporating visual metaphors that explore the production, absorption and experimental challenge to reinterpret figurative art.

Living systems in conversation; a definition of metabolism that continues to shape the relationship to Gimbel’s artwork. In this sense the act of repetition, production and mastery of a subject become the expressed deconstruction of aesthetics. Traditional drawing and digitized drawing approaches are recontextualized and apportioned into a uniformly balanced painting. The works exist not as homage nor appropriation, rather the vassal of the visual experience.

Virtual Tour:

Past Exhibition

Print Educators of Colorado and the Artists of Oehme Graphics

Exhibition runs February 25th 2016 - April 2nd 2016
THE PRINT EDUCATORS OF COLORADO AND OEHME GRAPHICS
OPENING RECEPTION February 25TH, 2016  6PM-9PM

 

Press Release
  • Exhibition: Print Educators of Colorado and the Artists of Oehme Graphics
  • Showing: February 25th 2016 - April 2nd 2016
  • Opening Reception: THURSDAY FEBRUARY 25TH, 2016 6PM-9PM

A MO’Print event:

 

PRINT EDUCATORS OF COLORADO:

Print Educators of Colorado is an exhibition featuring practicing print educators from Universities, Colleges, and Art Schools throughout the state of Colorado. The event seeks to celebrate the participating artists’ varied contributions to the print discipline, while honoring their dedication to inspiring new generations of artists.

MARK LUNNING | ALICIA MCKIM | ASHLEY NASON | CHINN WANG

JACOB CUSTER | CATHERINE CHAUVIN | THERESA HABERKORN

JAMES DORMER | JENNIFER GHORMLEY  |  DENNIS DALTON

OEHME GRAPHICS:

Also featured on the mezzanine is new work printed by Oehme Graphics.  This event seeks to highlight new work created by nationally recognized artists in collaboration with master printer Susan Oehme. Oehme Graphics is a fine art print publisher and printmaking facility located in Steamboat Springs, CO.

DAVID ROW   |  DEBORAH FREEDMAN   |   JASON KAROLAK  |   JEFFREY KEITH

GLORIA PEREYRA | HOMARE IKEDA | PATSH KREBS | LAURA WAIT   |  MELISSA MEYER

MONROE HODDER  |  DIANE CIONNI   |   TAIKO CHANDLER  |   DOROTHEA VAN CAMP

Past Exhibition

BLACK

Exhibition runs October 22nd 2015 - November 28th 2015
OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY OCTOBER 22ND 5-9PM
FEATURING:

MARKS AARDSMA  |  TONIA BONNELL

SHARON SWIDLER  |  NANCY CHARAK

NANCY KOENIGSBERG   |  DIANE MCGREGOR

COREY POSTIGLIONE  |  SUSAN SCHWALB

CHECK OUT OUR 360 DEGREE TOUR
Check out our 360 degree tour

 

Press Release
  • Exhibition: BLACK
  • Showing: October 22nd 2015 - November 28th 2015

“… I was no longer working with black… but with the material of black, the surfaces of black… created a light… and this light is a secret light… a light that is not obvious… it was coming out of the black….”
—Pierre Soulages

BLACK is number six in the Art of the Real series shows I have curated for Space Gallery. Each show in this series manifests itself in the “non-objective”: art that is not representational, that contains no recognizable figures or objects, and art that has no intentional derivation from any concrete matter.

The work for BLACK was selected because each artist uses black, not as negative space, but as an opening from which to reveal what lies at the edge of vision.

Curated by: Marks Aardsma
Concept by: Sharon Swidler

Featured Artists:

Marks Aardsma

For several decades, Marks Aardsma has explored the ontology of painting (canvas) – the nature of painting in and of itself, investigating the essential properties of painting: color, line and rhythm, surface texture and tension, shadow and light …. principally via subtraction or deconstruction of canvas to reveal its original structure – vertical and horizontal threads or lines – and eliminating all the ‘stuff’ artists have been adding to the canvas surface for centuries.  The result is line, light, shadow – on the surface and behind the surface.  Her work is pure, clean and raw.  The space is physical, not illusory.  Marks Aardsma’s pieces are not abstractions of an objective reality, but expressions of object-ness – all the visual aspects of her work are real and immediate.

Tonia Bonnell 

Using repetitive marks to develop my images, I explore the concept that complexity can arise from the interaction of many simple components – examples include flocks of birds flying in unison, molecules and microscopic particles forming our visible world, and separate notes forming a musical composition. In these drawings, the individual marks – like notes of music – gain complexity when composed and layered. Drawn on the front and back of the drafting vellum, the marks appear to merge into a fluid form while remaining separated by varying amounts of space. The thin, translucent drawing surface allows the form to appear whole while also acting as a barrier: marks are either on the front or back but cannot occupy the space of the drafting vellum. Remnants of erased marks blur the boundary of this barrier and add to the illusion of depth or volume. The resulting images invite the viewer to draw closely, inspecting the manner in which the marks interact with the surface.

 

Nancy Charak

My purpose as an artist is not necessarily to tell the truth—it is to captivate you for as long as I can hold your attention. It is not necessary for the artwork to be any more than what it is. What is necessary is for the art to flow from inside and to allow the artwork to spring from my entire set of experiences and sensibilities as an artist.

My current favorite giants, to name just the women, are Agnes Martin and Joan Mitchell for the purity of their thought and action on the canvas as well as Linda Karshan, Sandra Blow, Vija Celmins, and Katherina Grosse. Whether what they do is lyrical, expository or just plain brash, to my way of thinking they are all pure abstract expressionists who make marks, lines, shapes, colors on paper, canvas, even buildings, and say to us, “here look at this, make of it what you will.”

Corey Posiglione

The Tango Series is a group of paintings I have been developing since 2009. It grew out of the Labyrinth Series and continues to explore the theme of unpredictable passages through ones’ life. For this recent body of work I have focused on one motif, the intertwined oval configuration. I am continuing to use abstraction semiotically to express concerns of entanglement, puzzlement, connectedness, and disconnectedness. The personal metaphor also moves to a larger context of the global and the present day multitude of world problems. The painting’s images of intertwined, and at the same time, disconnected ovals reference a state of complication, confusion, and perplexity. Moreover, the paintings are, like their title, about the dance; its movement, precision, and seduction.

Susan Schwalb

I use the classical Renaissance technique of metalpoint in ways which challenge all the traditional concepts. Juxtaposing a wide variety of metals (silver, gold, brass, copper, platinum, pewter, bronze and aluminum) I obtain soft shifts in tone and color reminiscent of the luminous transparency of watercolor. Lines and tone evoke an atmosphere of serenity, and the shimmer of light on the surface, created by the metals, is quite unlike any of the usual effects of metalpoint.

I have been working within a square format almost exclusively since 1997. In recent works, I created a counterpoint between fine lines drawn with a stylus and broad swatches of bronze, aluminum or copper tones that are made with metal wool pads.

For the exhibition entitled “Black” I used a ground of black gesso on panels with significant depth so that the image could wrap around the edges. I consider these works 3-dimensional drawings and they range from minimal imagery to works of a more complex linearity.

Nancy Koenigsberg

For the past twenty years my work has been concerned with interlocking lines and the spaces they form. I create a sense of weightlessness and luminescence by the manipulation of narrow gauge industrial wire. I am exploring the contradiction between metal elements known for their strength and durability and the delicacy of the textiles created. In some works lace-like layers of nets allow for transparency, the passage of light and the formation of shadows. In other works the nets are thickly layered and become almost opaque. Lines cross and re-cross to create a complex fabric and tangle of shadows. The objects appear fragile, but I seek to maintain their strength through the use of these materials.

Diane McGregor

Although a grid is often a rather mechanical arrangement, its classical order and repetitive structure expresses a purity of line and clarity of form that I love. Using minimalist grids to develop meditative fields of layered oil paint, my work contrasts visual elements of stillness and rhythm, order and randomness, and the geometric with the organic. My process is both methodical and intuitive. Each individual unit of the grid is carefully composed, one at a time, starting from upper left to lower right. Every small rectangle is developed in relation to the surrounding rectangles. The slow, contemplative process of building up the forms, textures, and composition is a healing and meditative experience, which is further heightened by the repetitive, devotional application of the grid itself.

Sharon Swidler 

I was 15 when I first encountered Clyfford Still’s 1951/1552 at The Art Institute of Chicago and was immediately entranced; filled with wonder about the mystery that lay within a two dimensional black surface, and delighted by the strength of the patches of color that dared to jump out of the seemingly endless void. 1951/1552 made sense and became my touchstone, serving as a portal to the simultaneous quiet and chaos within my soul.

In 2009, AIC built a new wing and relegated 1951/1552 to storage. I miss it, but having spent so much time contemplating this painting, it continues to resonate and influence my work as an artist. I am proud to premiere my “Still” series of paintings in Denver.

High Resolution Images Available Upon Request

 

Past Exhibition

CONFLUENCE

Exhibition runs September 10th 2015 - October 17th 2015
OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 10TH 5-8PM
FEATURING:

MONICA AIELLO  |  TYLER AIELLO

PAUL ECKE   |  BETSY STEWART

ALL ARTISTS IN ATTENDANCE
Press Release
  • Exhibition: CONFLUENCE
  • Showing: September 10th 2015 - October 17th 2015

Denver—Water. Rising sea levels, tales of drought and increasing scarcity, discussions around its rights, its uses, its increasingly critical role as a global currency: Water is a critical planetary issue that’s very much front and center for those of us in Colorado. And now, it’s the subject of an evocative and thought-provoking new exhibition at Denver’s Space Gallery.

“Water is a complex and loaded topic,” says curator and gallerist Michael Burnett. “And in this showing, we’ll explore Confluence as the place where art and issues come together.”

Confluence, featuring works by Tyler Aiello, Monica Aiello, Betsy Stewart and Paul Ecke, examines the subject of water—not in an overtly political way, but rather as a way to fuse creativity with our conscious awareness of the subject matter. In Confluence, the artists employ unexpected shapes, colors and media to suggest the presence of water, our involvement with it and, by implication, the considerations that accompany it.

“Art is perhaps the truest and most immediate form of storytelling,” artist Paul Ecke reflected. “And water gives us a vital and important story to tell.”

Artist and environmental activist Monica Aiello agrees. “Literally and metaphorically, rivers are the life blood of Earth. Like our own circulatory systems, they bring life to global civilizations. It’s a topic we must pay attention to and a conversation that must be had. We no longer have a choice.”

“In this space, at this time,” Michael Burnett concludes, “water will inform an intimate experience with art. We see will see a confluence of the beauty, the urgency and the necessity. And if we walk away with one more moment of consideration for the truth behind the beauty, then this show will have done its job.”

The exhibit runs through October 17th at Space Gallery, 400 Santa Fe Drive, the southernmost anchor of Denver’s thriving Santa Fe Arts District.

Artist Statements

Monica Aiello

For the past decade, I’ve been exploring the worlds of our solar system through paint.  I’ve had a wonderful opportunity to collaborate with NASA scientists dissecting the geology of our planetary neighbors while conveying their stories in mixed-media works. Throughout this process, I’m often asked, “why planets?” To respond to this question, I’ve recently turned my focus back to Earth so to speak. Although obvious, it’s sometimes easy to forget that Earth is a planet – a marvelous, complex and fragile system we call home.  My newest series embarks on a journey to investigate our unique world from the vantage point of space.

Earth is marvelously yet dauntingly complex.  Its crust is shaped not only by pervasive geologic activity; the surface of Earth has been carved by humans. So I struggled with where to begin. One day, while listening to NPR, I heard a poem by Langston Hughes, “The Negro Speaks of Rivers.” This impressed upon me the role of rivers in shaping our planet, its habitability, history and civilizations. Around the same time, I had the chance to visit both the headwaters of the Colorado River in Rocky Mountain National Park and its course through the Grand Canyon. I was struck by the story of the Colorado River in shaping the landscape and development of the American West and my new series was born.

Literally and metaphorically, rivers are the life blood of Earth. Their cycles parallel our bodies’ circulatory systems as they journey to deliver fresh water and nutrients to the land. They also have defined the development of civilizations, providing essential resources and conduits for our societies to flourish. The story of the Colorado River embodies the power of rivers as essential to land and life. My new series takes a look at the journey of the Colorado River from humble headwaters to its untimely demise before it reaches the Sea of Cortez. The Colorado River is one of the most heavily legislated, litigated and manipulated rivers in the world with international implications. Its watershed allowed for the “desert to bloom” as predicted by John Wesley Powell, but human impact has also had devastating effects on its health and the environment. From Denver to Phoenix, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, and San Diego, the Colorado River is crucial for millions of people and huge agricultural enterprises. The American public literally feeds off the bounty of the river every day. However, this precious resource is at risk and it is truly and endangered landscape.

My new series takes a look at the Colorado River basin as captured by Earth orbiting satellites. Views from this remote sensing perspective truly highlight the journey of the Colorado River as manipulated and impacted by human development – a true example of the Anthropocene. This is dramatically seen in the contrast of the fractal and organic patterns viewed in the natural landscape as juxtaposed with the geometric manipulation of Earth’s surface pervasive in our urban and agricultural areas. For this series, I’m interested in investigating the juxtaposing forms of man vs. nature while contemplating the history and future of this remarkable, iconic and fragile resource.

Tyler Aiello

My sculpture blends my interest in science and the natural world with a love of process and materials. Fundamentally, I am interested in exploring the intersection of art, science and community. I enjoy working with industrial materials to produce contemporary sculpture that references old-world craftsmanship. My pieces are composed of numerous small metal and wooden components which unite to create organic, biomorphic forms. Often, I incorporate light to emphasize the work’s negative space and create shadow which extends the work’s effect to the surrounding architectural environment.  For inspiration, I draw from a variety of sources including microbiology, botany and chemistry – often incorporating mathematics. In preparing for my work, I have had the good fortune of consulting with NASA and the scientific community which has provided constant inspiration. Throughout the process, a focus on detail is critical – both in terms of looking at the minute details in nature, as well as the detail present in each piece.

My studio practice involves a complex, laborious process in order to infuse my work with the craftsmanship and detail I find important. I hand-cut and forge numerous small steel components, often engineering my own specialized tools and hammers.  I form and texturize the metal components so that each piece has individual nuance. These pieces are then welded together over carved plaster molds to create organic, abstracted forms. I spend considerable time finishing the work through polishing and patinas to emphasize the surface quality. The process is important to both the aesthetics of the work, as well as having a conceptual intent. I am interested in the concept of “gestalt,” individual parts becoming wholes, which is a concept critical to chemistry, biology, and society.

My interest in connectivity and community extends from my work to my role as an educator and public outreach activist. Through my relationship with NASA and public institutions, I’ve had the opportunity to develop many programs for youth and adults that explore the connections between the arts and sciences. These have been presented at numerous museums, science institutions, NASA facilities, art schools, colleges and public schools nationwide.

Paul Ecke

Art in its truest form is like story telling … it’s creating a sense of engagement or dialog with the viewer.

I have combined luminous color, hand written notions, hieroglyphic symbols and everyday objects.  In this complex process of incorporating numerous layers of under painting in combination with screening and newsprint, I have created a personal note-pad or diary of sorts.

The viewer must not only observe the work but read them as well.  These paintings are intended to appear graphically simple, but delivering a considerable “emotional punch” with the complex depth of the messages with-in them.  As an artist, primarily of the abstract, I feel I have the freedom to explore and play with artistic elements from other genres.

Betsy Stewart

Using biomorphic images, my work examines the microscopic, mutually  dependent life systems found in water that are ever increasingly disappearing.  By giving these images a presence I speak to our fragile position in the cosmos. Each work becomes a manifesto of hope in a time where the natural world is increasingly fleeting and species at a rapid rate are becoming extinct.  These images explore the regenerative symmetry inherent to the morphing of the natural world.  Many of my works not only examine the micro elements of the environment but also in unison explore the exploding and radiating energy of our expanding universe that highlights the entwined nature of the all creatures. The viewer is encouraged to consider the unseen minutiae that saturate our micro/macro universe and the ever present fragility of these endangered organisms.

Past Exhibition

BEYOND THE PLANE

Exhibition runs July 30th 2015 - September 5th 2015
OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY JULY 30TH 5-8PM
FEATURING:

DUANE NOBLETT  |  HOWARD HERSH

JUDY CAMPBELL   |  LEWIS MCINNIS

PATRICIA AARON  | STEPHEN SHATCHMAN

ALL ARTISTS IN ATTENDANCE
Press Release
  • Exhibition: BEYOND THE PLANE
  • Showing: July 30th 2015 - September 5th 2015

Denver—Stand in front of a work of art and what do you see? The surface? The shapes? The colors? Or something deeper? Space Gallery announces a show that challenges our perceptions of form in Beyond the Plane, opening Thursday, July 30th in the gallery’s exhibition hall.

Rejecting preconceptions about conventional 2D surfaces, the works—from renowned artists Patricia Aaron, Judy Campbell, Howard Hersh, Lewis McInnis, Duane Noblett and Stephen Shachtman—explore structures that blur the line between form and execution.

“To limit our perceptions to the surface of an artwork is to sell ourselves short,” says gallerist Michael Burnett. “It robs us of the ability to follow color and shape deeper into the work…to make the journey from sight to idea as the artist intended—where the most interesting stuff is.”

Beyond the Plane’s works will make unique demands of the viewer; an ask to find the presence in form, medium and process to discover the artist’s vision beyond it. This is a transforming of conventional space in which geometric forms appear and disappear; an environment where shapes reach out beyond the canvases’ boundaries to create presence in an expected plane.

“Think of the collection as an invitation to a surprising conversation,” Burnett concludes: “a dialog that begins on a surface level, and ends up deeper than you might have expected. That’s the best part of an experience like this one—winding up in a different, more interesting place than where you started.”

The exhibit runs through Labor Day weekend at Space Gallery, 400 Santa Fe Drive, the southernmost anchor of the thriving Santa Fe Arts District.

Past Exhibition

NATURE’S LINE

Exhibition runs June 18th 2015 - July 25th 2015
OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY JUNE 18TH 6-8PM
FEATURING:

CARLENE FRANCIS  |  DIANE CIONNI  |  IAN MCLAUGHLIN  |  JOHN WOOD  |  KAREN SCHARER  | LAURA WAIT  |  MIGUEL EDWARDS |  TAIKO CHANDLER

ALL ARTIST IN ATTENDANCE
ABUNDANT STREET PARKING AND PRIVATE LOT BEHIND GALLERY
Press Release
  • Exhibition: NATURE’S LINE
  • Showing: June 18th 2015 - July 25th 2015
  • Opening Reception: June 18th 6-8PM

DENVER — Over stimulated by electronic information and computerized images, artists continue to mine inspiration from nature. Nature’s universal beauty beckons us, as it has throughout history. We crave its simplicity. Although, the simplicity of nature is fleeting. We have phantom cravings for virgin land. We forget that contemporary relationships with nature are abstract and idealized.

Nature’s Line forces the contemplation of nature’s role in today’s cultural landscape. Eight artists redefine natural forms through their unique lenses, leaving the viewer to examine their own understanding of nature in our manmade world.

“My work is a reaction to the natural and the artificial that surrounds me” – Taiko Chandler

“In our modern world, which is growing smaller, the influences of the computer are everywhere” – Laura Wait

“I absorb, and translate, giving visual form to my response to the world around me” – Karen Scharer

“The paintings are snapshots, postcards [sent] home…as he travels uncharted territory” – Ian McLaughlin

“Amidst the density and jumble of form are glimpses of a lighter, lacy spaciousness. There is a suggestion of exuberance, surprise, and limitless possibility” – Diane Cionni

“I am touched by the delicate change of fading blossoms”
– John Wood

“I am constantly investigating new ways to explore beauty, and locate hidden common denominators in the world we perceive” – Miguel Edwards

“My paintings draw from…a striving for serenity in a world inundated by input” – Carlene Frances

For more information, contact:
Michael Burnett – Space Gallery
400 Santa Fe Drive – Denver, CO 80204
Phone: (720)-904-1088 Email: mb_space@hotmail.com

Past Exhibition

PATTERN – Geometric | Organic

Exhibition runs May 1st 2015 - June 13th 2015
OPENING RECEPTION: FRIDAY MAY 1st 6-8PM
FEATURING:

TYLER AIELLO | KAREN FREEDMAN   NOUMAN GAAFAR | AMBER GEORGE         JANE GUTHRIDGE | RUTH HILLER                   JOANNE MATTERA | COREY POSTIGILIONE & LYNDA RAY

 

 

 

ALL ARTIST IN ATTENDANCE
CATALOGS AVAILABLE http://www.magcloud.com/browse/issue/918091

 

ABUNDANT STREET PARKING AND PRIVATE LOT BEHIND GALLERY
Press Release
  • Exhibition: PATTERN – Geometric | Organic
  • Showing: May 1st 2015 - June 13th 2015
  • Opening Reception: ARTIST RECEPTION: MAY 1st 6-8PM

SPACE GALLERY
•FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE•

For more information, contact:
Michael Burnett • Space Gallery
400 Santa Fe Drive • Denver, CO 80204
Phone: (720) 904-1088 Email: mb_spacemail.com

Patterns: Organic/Geometric
Space Gallery, May 1-June 13, 2015
Opening reception: 6-8 PM. Artists in attendance.

DENVER—Space Gallery is excited to announce a show that examines the relationship between shape, space, and how we connect with them—Patterns: Organic/Geometric, opening Friday, May 1 at Denver’s Space Gallery.

“The desire to create order in our lives is innate in all of us,” says Space gallerist Michael Burnett. “We look for patterns naturally. We seek to control, to find the edges. It’s how we make sense of things. This show takes us to a different understanding of what’s built into each of us.”

Far from being a series of shapes that come together in linear ways, the show’s wide ranging visual cadences reach past viewers’ expectations and ask them to engage differently.

“Patterns are connections between things that show us boundaries. Yet, they can also free us from them,” artist Karen Freedman reflected. “This show will surprise people. What a lot of folks think patterns are, they won’t necessarily be.”

Beyond its unique conversations of form and color, of light and shadow, the show introduces an expanded view to Space Gallery’s commitment to the abstract arts: Patterns brings together artists from across the country, many of whom will be seen in Denver for the first time.

“Not only is the art audience growing here,” Burnett observed, “but this city is also becoming a magnet for artists of national renown. Coast to coast, the art community is hearing what’s happening here and wants to be part of the excitement. This show celebrates Denver’s role on that national stage.”

Patterns includes painters, sculptors and multimedia artists from across the country, including: Jane Gutheridge, Ruth Hiller, Nouman Gaafar, Tyler Aiello (CO); Karen Freedman (PA), Joanne Mattera (New York City), Amber George (CA), Lynda Ray (VA), and Corey Postiglione (IL).

“In many ways, the Patterns show is going to be different from anything we’ve done,” Burnett concluded. “It’s going to be a lively, colorful, challenging experience that people will experience in dozens of unexpected ways. I can’t wait to see the reaction.”

Space Gallery, at 400 Santa Fe Drive, has in a very short time become the southern anchor for the lively Santa Fe Arts District, a purpose-built a testament to Denver’s thriving art scene and the kaleidoscopic ideas that live there.

Past Exhibition

ART & SOUL

Exhibition runs April 2nd 2015 - April 26th 2015

ART STUDENTS LEAGUE OF DENVER PRESENTS ART & SOUL

BIENNIAL GALA & FINE ART EXHIBITION

JURIED BY CHRISTOPH HEINRICH

TICKETED GALA OPENING RECEPTION: APRIL 18TH, 6.30PM

 

  • ART & SOUL
Press Release
  • Exhibition: ART & SOUL
  • Showing: April 2nd 2015 - April 26th 2015
  • Opening Reception: APRIL 18TH, 6.30PM

For Immediate Release Contact: Kim McCarty
303-517-3212
k.mccarty@asld.org
ASLD.org

Art Students League’s ART&SOUL to Feature Artists from Across the US, Selected by Christoph Heinrich of DAM

ART&SOUL
Biennial Gala | Fine Art Sale & Auction
Exhibition: April 2 – 25, 2015
Gala | Fine Art Sale & Auction: April 18, 2015
SPACE Gallery | 400 Santa Fe Drive, Denver

The Art Students League of Denver’s (ASLD) biennial gala, ART&SOUL will feature work juried by Christoph Heinrich, PhD, Frederick & Jan Mayer Director of the Denver Art Museum. Presented by Delta Dental of Colorado, the ART&SOUL gala and juried exhibition will be held at SPACE Gallery in Denver’s Art District on Santa Fe. The exhibition will be on view April 2 – 25, 2015 in conjunction with the fundraising gala on April 18 to benefit the programing and mission of ASLD. Work from the exhibition will be available for purchase at the gala, in addition to artwork from invited artists that will be available for auction exclusively the night of the gala.

Of the 420 entries from across the country for the ART&SOUL juried exhibition, Heinrich narrowed the field down to 75 pieces. The juried work represents a wide breadth of media and genres that reflect on the meaning of soul. “It’s been a great journey to travel through the 420 entries for the Art Students League exhibition: Many delivered visual reflections of what the soul is and how it can be expressed through art. I still don’t totally know where that soul lies, and to what purpose, but I found many different ways to search for it, play with it, catch it and define it! And with that – soul or not – there is a lot of great art that can be explored by soul mates and kindred spirits in the splendid new rooms of SPACE gallery,” reflected Heinrich of his jury process. Heinrich will also curate the exhibition with ASLD’s gallery manager, Robin Whatley. Work from the juried artists can be viewed before the opening at ASLD.org.

ASLD’s ART&SOUL biennial gala, with honorary gala chairpersons, Landis and Sharon Martin will feature artful culinary delights, creative cocktails, vibrant entertainment and an exclusive fine art sale and auction. The ART&SOUL Host Committee is chaired by Fritz and Stacy Smith. Smith, senior vice president for IHS and long-time supporter of ASLD expects the event to sell out based on the art community’s overwhelming support of ASLD’s. Tickets can be purchased at ASLD.org.

Delta Dental of Colorado has signed on a Presenting Sponsor. “Art is at the heart of what makes Denver a vibrant and special place, and we are thrilled to support the Art Students League of Denver in helping local artists reach their full potential. The ART&SOUL exhibit and gala is a not-to-be-missed event for anyone with an interest in the arts,” said Greg Vochis, controller for Delta Dental of Colorado and ASLD board member.

In addition to artwork from the juried exhibition, gala revelers will be able to bid on 20 exclusive pieces from invited ASLD artists. The auction work will be available exclusively the night of the gala and features the work of such area luminaries as Daniel Sprick, Andrea Kemp, Quang Ho, Molly Davis, Clark Richert, Tony Ortega, Homare Ikeda and Martha Russo. As a special perk for Elite Patron ticket holder, Kevin Sloan, this year’s ART&SOUL featured artist will open up his studio for an exclusive brunch and tour on April 12. Invited auction work can be viewed at ASLD.org.

New this year to the biennial gala are efforts to draw in the under 40, young professional through the Moxie Mob $50 ticket. “It’s a great bargain for an all-inclusive evening of great food cocktails and entertainment,” said Kate Rooney of Wells Fargo, as well as board member for ASLD and one of the gala’s Moxie Mob Committee chairs. Rooney summed up the Moxie Mob best, “The driving force behind ASLD’s new Moxie Mob is to provide Denver’s future business leaders with a path to support and appreciate Denver’s emerging artists.”

The ART&SOUL exhibition can be viewed at SPACE Gallery, during regular business hours, April 2 – 25, 2015. Tickets for the April 18, ART&SOUL Gala can be purchased online at ASLD.org. The Patron Champagne Preview begins at 5:30 and the main event at 6:30. Please visit ASLD.org to purchase tickets and for more information on the exhibition and gala.

###

About the Art Students League of Denver:
Established in 1987, The Art Students League of Denver provides an inclusive art community where professional artists guide individuals of all abilities to reach their highest potential. The Art Students League of Denver, along with the Denver Public Library, recently won the 2013 Mayor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts.

Past Exhibition

‘GRAYS’ curated by SARAH LAVIGNE

Exhibition runs February 12th 2015 - March 22nd 2015
FEATURING: ANNIE MARIE MUSSELMAN | MANDY BARKER | ACACIA JOHNSON | MICHAEL LEWIS
  • WolfHaven 12 30"x40" ANNIE MARIE MUSSELMAN
  • SHOAL 3 49"x38" MANY BARKER
  • POLARIS 14 30"x40" ACACIA JOHNSON
  • CAR IN SNOW 30"x30" MICHAEL LEWIS
Press Release
  • Exhibition: ‘GRAYS’ curated by SARAH LAVIGNE
  • Showing: February 12th 2015 - March 22nd 2015
  • Opening Reception: OPENING RECEPTION FEB 12TH 6-9PM

In a groundbreaking new exhibition at Space Gallery starting February 12th, curator Sarah LaVigne introduces provocative themes of preservation, symbolism and metaphor that take their audience as far afield as Alaskan landscapes, challenged marine resources and film noir.

“Grays is a blurring of the lines between what’s real – and what might be.” – Sarah LaVigne

“The four photographers featured in Grays challenge people to re-imagine their individual notions of reality,” says exhibition curator (and 5280 Magazine Photo Editor) LaVigne. “The works abstract their subjects in subtle or dramatic ways, transporting the viewer beyond the black or white poles of factual perception into places I call ‘the grays’.”

Photographer Acacia’s landscapes disengage viewers from the comfort zone of familiarity, casting the artist in a dusky landscape of consciousness and memory, wonder, fear and anticipation.

Mandy Barker’s work spurs a conversation about pollution and the world’s oceans, challenging the viewer to regard natural beauty and environmental catastrophe in the same mental breath.

Anne Marie Musselman offers a privileged close-up look inside Wolf Haven International, the nationally-recognized wolf rescue sanctuary in Puget Sound—images that conjure the beauty, complexity and playfulness of these extraordinary creatures, and carry viewers to a wilder place.

Michael Lewis erases the line between fantasy and a darker reality in his ‘Tales’ of daily life: still life works that become a cinematic exercise of symbolism, metaphor and unrestrained imagination.

“This coming-together of photographic imagery represents something of a departure for Space,” said gallerist Michael Burnett. “But crossing the line into abstraction and metaphor: That’s right in our wheelhouse…and it’s something that gallery regulars and newcomers alike will really enjoy.”

Space Gallery, at 400 Santa Fe Drive, has in a very short time become the southernmost anchor for the Santa Fe Arts District, a purpose-built a testament to Denver’s thriving art scene and the kaleidoscopic ideas that live there.

Past Exhibition

The 12 Inches of Christmas Holiday Extravaganza!

Exhibition runs December 2nd 2014 - January 24th 2015
    • Corey Postiglione
Press Release
  • Exhibition: The 12 Inches of Christmas Holiday Extravaganza!
  • Showing: December 2nd 2014 - January 24th 2015
  • Opening Reception: December 9, 2014

Space Gallery is pleased to present ‘The 12 Inches of Christmas Holiday Extravaganza!’ The exhibition will feature more than 30 established artists, each producing a mini-series in a 12″x12″ format. Part giant art show, part epic holiday party. Please join us as we kick-off the holiday season with good cheer and fun!

Artists Include: Marks Aardsma, Patricia Aaron, Kate Beck, Tonia Bonnell, Michael Burnett, Judy Campbell, Taiko Chandler, Nancy Charak, Diane Cionni, Jeff Curry, Ryan David, Haze Diedrich, Jana Diedrich, Sophia Dixon Dillo, Graeme Duncan, Miguel Edwards, Marcus Fitzgibbons, Sarah Fox, Carlene Frances, Jason Lee Gimbel, Jane Guthridge, Howard Hersh, Scott Holdeman, Jeff Juhlin, Nancy Koenigsberg, Diane McGregor, Lewis McInnis, Ian McLaughlin, Conor O’Donnell, Corey Postiglione, Lisa Purdy, Mike Rand, David Sawyer, Karen Scharer, Marleen Seckendorf, Steve Shachtman, Betsy Stewart, Sharon Swidler, Laura Wait, John Wood, Anya Zuckerberg.

Past Exhibition

Momentum

Exhibition runs November 7th 2014 - November 27th 2014

MARS-1 | DAMON SOULE | OLIVER VERNON

FUTHERRR COLLECTIVE

Press Release
  • Exhibition: Momentum
  • Showing: November 7th 2014 - November 27th 2014
  • Opening Reception: Friday November 7th

Space Gallery is pleased to present Momentum, a groundbreaking new show by three of the west coast’s most renowned contemporary artists, Mars – 1, Damon Soule and Oliver Vernon-aka the Furtherrr Collective-whose works are mainstays of private collections and public spaces across the country.

A marriage of street art and psychedelic abstract, future-focused art, the show is, as gallerist Michael Burnett observes, “An unprecedented accomplishment; the pinnacle of 6 years of collaboration.”

Already on the must-see calendars of guests from across the country, Momentum will feature works in diverse media, including paint, bronze, pen and ink and collage, many in unconventional shapes designed to change perceptions of the use of space itself and the viewer’s relationship to it.

Most striking about the show is its centerpiece, a sweeping 9 by 22-foot canvas of a scope rarely found outside museums.

“This will be something really new that people haven’t experienced, on a scale they’ve never seen before,” said Parsons-trained artist Oliver Vernon.

“This is the biggest collaborative canvas of their careers,” show organizer Brian Chambers added. “Every way you look at it, there’ll be something new to see and wonder at. No two people are going to experience the same thing-it’ll be a very different exploration for everybody.”

Working in both the fine art and street art traditions, the Furtherrr trio announced itself to Denver in late August with a massive streetside mural at the Cultivate store at 666 Buchtel. Not only was the huge, week-long production an introduction to the scale of the artists’ ideas, it was also an introduction to a way of working well-known to street art, but not to the gallery world: collaboration and improvisation.

Partners in collaboration since 2009, Mars-1, Soule and Vernon address their street and fine art projects with no advance sketching; no plan. Damon Soule described the process: “We let go of what we think the work should be. The lines blur between one and the other. Painting over someone else’s work, letting go, is part of the process. When you open up to other artists, you get to new places.”

“The fine art world hasn’t embraced collaborative art as a valid expression,” said Chambers, “maybe because no one has really done it like this before…no one has done it like this. Ever.”

And why Denver? “It’s not a coincidence that we’re doing this show here. This is one of the most progressive cities in the world. This art is right for right now, and Denver is the perfect place for it,” Chambers said. “We checked out a lot of the galleries in town; Space Gallery was hands down the right choice for the show.”

“This show will change the art scene in Denver,” said co-organizer (and Denver resident) Brady Alexander. “These guys are ahead of the curve. The work will open a lot of people’s eyes. Even for people who like contemporary art, this will be very different.”

Gallery director Michael Burnett summed it up simply: “This may be one of the most significant shows ever to hit the Santa Fe Arts District-and even the Denver gallery scene as a whole. We can’t wait for people’s reaction.”

Also exhibiting in the project room new works by Justin Lavato from his series entitled ‘Prima Materia’ created over the last six months.

Past Exhibition

Surface (part 5 in the Art of the Real Series)

Exhibition runs September 26th 2014 - November 1st 2014

MARKS AARDSMA | TONIA BONNELL | MICHAEL BURNETT | NANCY CHARAK | SOPHIA DIXON DILLO | CARLENE FRANCES | SUSAN M. GIBBONS | NANCY KOENIGSBERG | DIANE MCGREGOR | SHARON SWIDLER

    • Marks Aardsma
    • Untitled
    • Tonia Bonnell
    • Surface: Before and Beneath 1
    • Nancy Charak
    • How Many Miles to Babylon
    • Sophia Dixon Dillo
    • Untitled
    • Carlene Frances
    • Surface #1
    • Susan M. Gibbons
    • Interstice - Monochrome I
    • Nancy Koenigsberg
    • Surface 1
    • Diane McGregor
    • Drift 1
    • Sharon Swidler
    • Breathless 1
Press Release
  • Exhibition: Surface (part 5 in the Art of the Real Series)
  • Showing: September 26th 2014 - November 1st 2014
  • Opening Reception: Friday, September 26th 6-9pm

This show interests itself in the “non-objective”: art that is not representational, that contains no recognizable figures or objects, art that has no intentional derivation from any concrete matter.

The work for this show was selected because each artist uses the surface as a crucial element beyond a vehicle on which to apply a medium….either revealing what is behind/under the surface or concealing/altering/manipulating the surface itself and in a palette of white, black, gray, or neutral.

Past Exhibition

Natural Surroundings

Exhibition runs August 15th 2014 - September 20th 2014

Patricia Aaron | Haze Diedrich | Jane Guthridge | Howard Hersh | Jeff Juhlin | Stephen Shachtman | Bill Snider | Betsy Stewart | Laura Wait | John Wood

 

    • Patricia Aaron
    • Sugar Train
    • Jane Guthridge
    • Pools of Light 10
    • Jeff Juhlin
    • Penumbra
    • Howard Hersh
    • Skin Deep 8
    • Fontis No. 97
    • Acrylic and Sumi Ink on Wood
    • 5" x 5" x 5"
    • Laura Wait
    • Maxixe I
    • Bill Snider
    • BX14 2b
    • John Wood
    • Flooded with Light
    • Stephen Shachtman
    • That Time When the Moon Lit the Way
Press Release
  • Exhibition: Natural Surroundings
  • Showing: August 15th 2014 - September 20th 2014
  • Opening Reception: Thursday, August 28th 6-9pm

Past Exhibition

FUSION 5

Exhibition runs July 10th 2014 - August 9th 2014

Artists: Marks Aardsma | Carlene Frances | Gayla Lemke | Pat Orban | Sue Gibbons | Bob Maes | Robin Ross |

Poets: Kristin Aardsma | Lynne Brescia | Jim Cohn | M.D. Friedman | Wayne Gilbert | Meghan Howes | Lauren Sabel |

    • Fusion 5 Exhibition
    • Fusion 5 Exhibition
    • Fusion 5 Exhibition
    • Fusion 5 Exhibition
    • Fusion 5 Exhibition
    • Fusion 5 Exhibition
Press Release
  • Exhibition: FUSION 5
  • Showing: July 10th 2014 - August 9th 2014
  • Opening Reception: Thursday, July 10, 6-9pm

First Friday Opening: August 1, 6-9pm

Fusion V explores the dynamic, connective tissue that bridges artistic mediums and highlights the collaborative synergies which occur when one medium (painting) draws inspiration from another (poetry) and vice versa.

Each painter is paired with a writer and the two respond to the others work, The poet/painter pairs collaborate with three pieces each and the poems will be mounted on the wall next to their painting. In addition there’s a central poem to which the 6 artists paint and a central painting to which the 6 poets write. An additional seventh artwork/poem is a sculptural piece by Gayla Lemke which includes her haiku poetry written within the surface of the work.

During the opening reception each poet reads aloud poems from their painter collaboration plus their poem written to the main painting. Wayne Gilbert will read his central poem, which has 6 individual interpretations from the painters. At 7:00 chairs will be available for the public during the 45 minute poetry reading.

The painter/poet pairs are as follows:
Carlene Frances is paired with Lauren Sabel
Robin Ross is paired with Lynne Brescia
Pat Orban is paired with M.D. Friedman
Bob Maes is paired with Jim Cohn
Sue Gibbons is paired with Wayne Gilbert
Jo Aardsma is paired with Kristin Aardsma

Past Exhibition

Grand Opening Exhibit

    • Space Gallery Grand Opening
    • Space Gallery Grand Opening
    • Space Gallery Grand Opening
    • Space Gallery Grand Opening
    • Space Gallery Grand Opening
    • Space Gallery Grand Opening
    • Space Gallery Grand Opening
    • Space Gallery Grand Opening
    • Space Gallery Grand Opening
Press Release
  • Exhibition: Grand Opening Exhibit
  • Showing: May 22nd 2014 - July 12th 2014
  • Opening Reception: Friday June 6, 6pm - 10pm

Please join us in celebrating 13 years in business and the completion of our new building with the grand opening of our new location at 4th & Santa Fe Friday, June 6th, 6-10pm. We’ve selected two pieces by each of the artists we represent for this inaugural exhibition to best showcase the quality and caliber of the Space aesthetic.

Past Exhibition

Marks, Color and Form: Prints at SPACE

Exhibition runs March 19th 2014 - May 17th 2014

Richard Bosman | Eva Bovenzi | Katherine Bowling | Taiko Chandler | Diane Cionni | Jack Cowin | Louise Fishman | Jeffrey Keith | Patsy Krebs | Claire Lieberman | Frederick Mershimer | Jason Rohlf | Mia Westerlund Roosen | David Row | Susan Thompson | Fred Tomaselli | Laura Wait | John Walker

    • Silk Stockings Poppies
    • Claire Lieberman
    • Lightrap Emerald
    • David Row
    • Reason and Romance 4
    • Diane Cionni
    • Red 11
    • Eva Bovenzi
    • Rooftop
    • Frederick Mershimer
    • FGPP 40
    • Jason Rohlf
    • Swing Set 17
    • Jeffrey Keither
    • Pearl Lake 30
    • John Walker
    • Winter
    • Katherine Bowling
    • Scriptograph 22
    • Laura Wait
    • Tout Suite 7
    • Louise Fishman
    • Mirrored Lines 1
    • Mia Westerlund Roosen
    • Stairway to Heaven
    • Patsy Krebs
    • Snow Squall
    • Richard Bosman
    • Reticolo 11
    • Susan Thompson
Press Release
  • Exhibition: Marks, Color and Form: Prints at SPACE
  • Showing: March 19th 2014 - May 17th 2014
  • Opening Reception: 5pm-8pm March 19, 2014